Study Finds Web Sites on Health Influence Care Decisions

THE JOURNAL RECORD, November 29, 2000 | Go to article overview

Study Finds Web Sites on Health Influence Care Decisions


WASHINGTON (AP) -- When Elise Roelands wanted to find out why her husband had kidney stones and how he could avoid them, she searched health sites on the Internet rather than going to a doctor.

"I learned some of the new treatments, and I learned it wasn't as terrible as I thought," said the 26-year-old hospice volunteer from Silver Spring, Md., who valued the convenience of clicking on Web pages from home.

A new survey of Americans' use of the Internet shows that Roelands is hardly alone in her online quest for medical information. The survey, prepared by the Pew Internet and American Life Project, queried more than 12,000 people about their Internet habits in order to discover how the Internet has changed the way people make health decisions.

"There's tons of anecdotal evidence about this, but this is the first time that anyone's quantified it," said Lee Rainie, director of the project and a co-author of the survey.

Rainie said most of those searching for health information online were seeking material for someone else.

Of those surveyed, 92 percent said their online search was useful and 81 percent said they learned something new.

About 47 percent of those seeking help for themselves said the answers influenced their decisions about treatment, and 36 percent of people looking on behalf of others said the same.

But while several health-centric Web services -- such as WebMD and drkoop.com -- have emerged to provide answers to health questions, Rainie said most of the people surveyed had a "scattershot searching activity" that brought them to many sites.

"The vast majority of people are doing health searches on their own," without help from advertisements, doctors, friends or anyone else, Rainie said.

"They're going to search engines and just typing in words."

Rainie said information seekers most liked sites with broad search engines. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Study Finds Web Sites on Health Influence Care Decisions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.