For Keeping Up-to-Date on America's Energy Pulse

By Ray Carter The Journal Record | THE JOURNAL RECORD, September 18, 2001 | Go to article overview

For Keeping Up-to-Date on America's Energy Pulse


Ray Carter The Journal Record, THE JOURNAL RECORD


If you want to understand the roller coaster fluctuations of gasoline prices or the outlook for natural gas this winter -- or if you just want to follow the energy markets in general -- then Energy Pulse could be the show for you.

Hosted by Dennis J. O'Brien, director of Energy Economics and Policy at the University of Oklahoma, the five-minute program is webcast each Friday as part of the 15-minute programming available at Williams Energy News Live, (www.EnergyNewsLive.com), an Internet- based news program produced by the Williams Cos.

The show, aimed at a target audience of 10,000 to 20,000 energy industry officials, encapsulates the latest news affecting all energy markets from electricity to oil in a 15-minute program.

O'Brien's weekly contribution, Energy Pulse, provides viewers with analysis of the markets and forecasts the direction those markets will take in coming weeks.

"I was approached to look at (commodity trends) and to try to do a forward look and be speculative," O'Brien said. "They needed someone crazy enough to do that."

But speculation drives markets as much as concrete data, O'Brien noted, and bridging the gap between hard data and public reaction is the major challenge faced by all energy officials when making financial decisions.

"The market doesn't react to the physical reality of supply and demand," he said. "What it does is it operates on perceptions."

The trick for people active in energy commodities is to make that connection -- something O'Brien hopes to do on Energy Pulse.

"We're in a commodity world that's driven by a very short kind of linkage between information and the market," O'Brien said. "And that's the critical thing today, is being able to combine the analysis and the accurate information to people in the market. And that's where we come in."

As a former chief economist and director of planning for a major refiner and marketer in Asia, O'Brien believes he has the experience to provide that linkage.

"The numbers don't tell the story," he said. "It's basically the instinct about what's behind the numbers and where the numbers are leading."

That philosophy drives what O'Brien does on Energy Pulse. In recent weeks on the show, O'Brien has addressed the outlook for gasoline prices, natural gas prices and the national economy. As part of his work on Energy Pulse, O'Brien also focuses on the impact that weather conditions have on energy prices, and he works with the meteorology department at OU as part of that segment.

O'Brien said modern technology has made his job easier. In the early 1980s, when O'Brien was hired by a large refiner to establish a shop of in-house analysts, it cost him more than $75,000 to set up the shop, due to the high costs of subscribing to statistical publications related to the energy industry. The costs of subscriptions steadily went up through the years, making it difficult for analysts to obtain the kind of information they needed, he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

For Keeping Up-to-Date on America's Energy Pulse
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.