NAACP President Files Complaint against Keating

By Marie Price The Journal Record | THE JOURNAL RECORD, August 2, 2001 | Go to article overview

NAACP President Files Complaint against Keating


Marie Price The Journal Record, THE JOURNAL RECORD


The president of the Oklahoma City Chapter of the NAACP on Wednesday filed a verified complaint against Gov. Frank Keating with the State Ethics Commission.

Unlike an unverified complaint, as Roosevelt Milton filed in February, a verified complaint requires only a majority vote of the five-member commission to launch an investigation. The panel must be unanimous in choosing to investigate an unverified complaint.

Milton was joined at a State Capitol news conference by Gordon Melson, former executive director of the Oklahoma Democratic Party. Melson, a former judge, is acting as Milton's legal adviser.

The complaint alleges that, by accepting $250,000 from New York financier Jack Dreyfus, then asking other government officials for favorable consideration of Dilantin, an anti-seizure drug touted by Dreyfus for behavioral modification, Keating improperly engaged in lobbying and violated his oath of office. State officials are prohibited from accepting anything of value for the performance of nonperformance of their duties. Milton also told the commission that Keating's handling of the money violated federal and state gift and tax laws, which require separate accounting of monetary gifts, and ethics regulations which require that such gifts be reported unless they are from family members.

"We do feel like there is a legitimate basis for this complaint," said Melson.

"We simply want to know what the parameters are," said Milton.

The NAACP would like it clarified whether it is legal for private individuals to give officials large amounts of money like this, he said.

"I want to say emphatically that this is a nonpartisan effort," Milton said.

No one in the NAACP or Democratic Party knew anything of the monetary gifts until Keating was left off of the list of possible candidates to fill Bush administration positions, and the checks were revealed from within the administration itself, he said.

"We come to you on behalf of integrity and ethics in government," Milton said.

Keating has said that the $250,000 was given to him by Dreyfus to help pay for the Keating children's education.

Attachments to the complaint also reference letters Keating wrote to President Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton and the other 49 governors seeking wider use of Dilantin, and use by Keating and family members of "plush accommodations," some owned by Dreyfus, in New York and Lake Tahoe. These events came to light in documents turned over to Melson by Keating's office under a freedom of information request. Earlier it was disclosed that meetings were set up with Department of Corrections officials seeking their support in expanding the use of Dilantin to include behavior modification and other uses.

Milton is asking the commission to seek the background questionnaire that Keating provided to the George W. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

NAACP President Files Complaint against Keating
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.