Electronic Data Discovery Is Hot Business

By Pribek, Jane | THE JOURNAL RECORD, August 3, 2007 | Go to article overview

Electronic Data Discovery Is Hot Business


Pribek, Jane, THE JOURNAL RECORD


MILWAUKEE - In 1987, there was one business dedicated solely to providing electronic data discovery (EDD) services. In 1992, there were about five more. In 2000, there were about 40. Today, there are over 600 offerings, or purporting to offer, these services. They range in size from very large enterprises, to one or two people.

So say George Socha and Thomas Gelbmann, two St. Paul-based law technology consultants who have studied the wildfire expansion of the EDD industry for the past five years.

Their latest report, entitled the Socha-Gelbmann Electronic Discovery Survey Report, concludes that in calendar 2006, commercial EDD revenues were about $2 billion, up 51 percent from 2005.

Socha was approached in spring 2003 by a firm providing EDD, among other services, to study the status quo, potential growth, key issues and trends within the industry. That firm was looking to expand the scope of its EDD services, but wanted to be sure the market was strong. To their surprise, no market research firm had ever examined the industry, and those it had discussed the idea with said that, because it was such a new area, they would need to spend time learning the industry first before commencing a study. That was too costly a proposition.

Socha, a former litigator who, at the time, was transitioning into a law tech consulting practice, asked Gelbmann to help him. Gelbmann, an independent law tech consultant, had worked as an IT professional in Minneapolis law firms for over 20 years, but he also had experience in market research within the legal field.

Although the two also have private consulting practices, they say the report is a massive annual undertaking. This year's report is 334 pages in length, with hundreds of supporting tables and charts.

The two begin their work in October, inviting over 1,000 people to participate. They send them extremely detailed spreadsheet questionnaires, and conduct lengthy interviews with each. In April, they begin their analysis, inserting the data into models and doing some fact-checking or "triangulation" to verify data. Then in June, they write the report.

The findings, not surprisingly, are quite different, when comparing that first report released in 2003, versus 2007's.

Socha says, "The market is much larger now; there are many more dollars spent; and there are many, many more players, both as active providers and active consumers of EDD services. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Electronic Data Discovery Is Hot Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.