Case Studies Examine the Complexities of Self-Assessment

By Hunter, Alyce | Journal of Staff Development, Spring 2006 | Go to article overview

Case Studies Examine the Complexities of Self-Assessment


Hunter, Alyce, Journal of Staff Development


Case studies examine the complexities of self-assessment Trusting What You Know: The High Stakes of Classroom Relationships By Miriam B. Raider-Roth 2005, Jossey-Bass Hardcover, 211 pages, $30 To order, call (877) 762-2974 Fax: (800) 597-3299 Web: www.wiley.com/ WileyCDA/

Reviewer's rating: 3 out of 4

What precisely are students expected to do and learn when their teachers ask them to assess their process, their work, and even themselves as learners? What are the effects of the classroom environment and the teacher-student relationship on this assessment? Trusting What You Know is a much-needed examination of the practice and act of self-assessment.

In a highly readable format that includes detailed case studies of four slightly precocious and very articulate 6th graders, Miriam Raider-Roth presents the findings of her research at the Terrace School, a small independent school in the Northeast with a child-centered philosophy in which students beginning in the youngest grades reflect on themselves and their learning.

The format of Trusting What You Know is a classic research study. Yet Raider-Roth accurately asserts that the book is "... a travelogue of my journey, in order to examine fundamental questions about relationship, trust, and learning" (p. 14). Raider-Roth contends that students' trust affects what they tell their teachers and friends and that self-assessment is really relational assessment. The complexities and interactions of relationships, trust, knowledge, and power affect self-assessment.

Raider-Roth challenges educators to think about their own actions by asking, "How genuine and authentic are teachers in their relationships with students?" (p.31). She concludes by asking, "If we learn that children are watching how we build relationships with them and are modulating their spoken knowledge accordingly, what impact will that have on the way we teach?" (p. 149).

The author says that Trusting What You Know has four implications for future educational practices and, particularly, for teachers' professional development. Teachers should learn to help students find and refine their authentic voices, to listen more attentively to their students' voiees, to create curricula that generate ongoing conversations between teachers and students, and to provide supportive school structures, such as scheduled time, to build quality relationships. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Case Studies Examine the Complexities of Self-Assessment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.