THROUGH THE CROSSHAIRS: A History of Snipers

By Stringer, Kevin D. | Military Review, January/February 2006 | Go to article overview

THROUGH THE CROSSHAIRS: A History of Snipers


Stringer, Kevin D., Military Review


THROUGH THE CROSSHAIRS: A History of Snipers, Andy Dougan, Carroll & Graf, New York, 2005, 320 pages, $26.00.

Warfare in the 21st century is characterized more and more by its precision, lethality, and unconventional nature. The military sniper incorporates these qualities in his battlefield function and is perhaps the model warrior for this age.

Andy Dougan's book Through the Crosshairs: A History of Snipers begins with the development of missile weapons in prehistoric times, which ultimately led to firearms and to the creation of the light infantry sharpshooter.

One original aspect of the book is Dougan's discussion of the sniper's image in military society. On one side we find him as an antihero, loathed by his normal infantry comrades as almost a murderer and perceived as "not playing fair." Yet, when properly employed, he often saves the lives of his condemning brothers-in-arms.

On the other side, there is an idealized view of him as a solitary figure amidst the mass carnage of war. His battle is that of the single marksman against his victim. The sniper provides a brutal poetry within the chaos of the battlefield: one shot, one kill. The reality probably lies somewhere between these extremes.

Dougan uses Ernest Hemingway's style: his prose is direct, easy to read, and noncomplex, but it lacks foreign-language sources on snipers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

THROUGH THE CROSSHAIRS: A History of Snipers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.