Decision Making 101

By Oldham, Scott | Law & Order, March 2006 | Go to article overview

Decision Making 101


Oldham, Scott, Law & Order


Have you ever given thought to what you want engraved on your tombstone? Ever stop to think that what is carved there will be what you are remembered by for the rest of eternity? What do you want to be remembered for? That you were a great patrol officer, a great detective, or great supervisor? Maybe you want to be remembered for the more meaningful things like being a wonderful spouse and parent. Maybe, just maybe, there are other things that you wish to be remembered for throughout time.

Deeds, not words, are what we should aspire to be remembered by. But alas something has to be printed in the granite. So, think about it, if you had to choose one word or short phrase that best summed up your life, what would it be?

Having a problem choosing?

Surely, it isn't because you are one of the masses that has just treaded water through his life and has no significant deeds to immortalize in granite.

Maybe you are just starting out and have yet to make your mark in life. No problem. Everyone needs a starting point. However, 45 years old is a little late in life to call a starting point. Many people go through life and keep pushing that "official" starting point closer and closer to their end line and suddenly realize that time has slipped away and that there is no time left. No time left to start, no time left to leave an indelible mark on the world. A life squandered.

Not everyone will have their own chapter in grade school history books. But everyone does have the opportunity to leave the world a better place. Even a small stone thrown into a large pond leaves far reaching ripples. History is replete with instances of seemingly localized incidents changing the world. Some of these have happened in the smallest of towns or jurisdictions.

If you have risen to the rank of sergeant, it is because you desire to make things in your section of the world better. It is because that you believe that you have the ability to influence and that you want to stand up and have a voice in how situations are handled. Maybe it won't happen to you in a dramatic fashion but then again maybe it will.

One decision you make, good or bad, can turn the path of history. And then again, one decision you do not make could also set the wheels in motion to alter the course of history as well. How is it better to be remembered? Is it better to be remembered as one who could not make a decision at the moment of truth or as one who stepped up and made the call? …

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