European Federation of Productivity Services

By Whitley, R. L. | Management Services, September 1996 | Go to article overview

European Federation of Productivity Services


Whitley, R. L., Management Services


Up to now, most of the work of the EFPS has been carried out through its functional areas, currently one entitled `Work and Pay' and another `International Productivity Development'.

`Work and Pay' organise an experience exchange conference each year. In November last year in Maastrich they covered strategic compensation. In their publicity for the conference they said many private and public organisations are engaged in very incisive processes of change due to technological innovations, mergers, globalisation of markets, demanding consumers and so forth. Consequently, there is an urge in almost each company to improve the quality of products and services provided, and to accelerate delivery time against equal or lower cost levels. This necessitates quite different and more innovative, management styles, competencies and practices. Among these there is a strong need for human resource management policies and instruments that are designed according to a well defined strategic concept, and that support the strategic mission and business plan of the company.

A major problem felt by many managers and consultants is however, how strategic compensation can be achieved. Strategic compensation assumes that a company's strategic business plan contains unambiguous, shared long term objectives. That is not however always the case. Strategic compensation also takes for granted that the various related HRM instruments such as performance appraisal, employee development and culture management, are integrated and strategically focused. More often than not, that is not the case.

European speakers from various organisations presented a wide variety of experiences, not only sharing their success stories but also their struggles and failures since it is the purpose of these experience exchange conferences to discuss the issues at hand with colleagues and experts. …

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