Cause-Specific Mortality in France and in the Former FRG, 1950-95: Similarities and Differences

By Haudidier, Benoît | Population, January-April 2005 | Go to article overview

Cause-Specific Mortality in France and in the Former FRG, 1950-95: Similarities and Differences


Haudidier, Benoît, Population


Life expectancy in France and the former Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) rose substantially in the second half of the twentieth century, as it did throughout the whole of western Europe. The evolution was very similar in both countries. Between 1958 and 1997, life expectancy at birth for men increased by 7.8 years in France and by 7.9 years in the former FRG, rising respectively from 66.8 to 74.6 years and from 66.5 to 74.4 years. For women, the increase was 9.2 and 8.9 years respectively, rising from 73.1 to 82.3 years in France and from 71.6 to 80.5 years in the former FRG. Over a period of 40 years, progress in the two countries was identical, with life expectancy remaining equal for males and becoming more favourable for French women. Though life expectancies in many western European countries converge for both males and females, only in France and the former FRG has life expectancy progressed in an identical or almost identical manner since the late 1950s. The fact that the two countries belong to two contrasting cultures - Latin and Germanic - makes this similarity all the more striking.The territory of the former FRG is used here both on practical grounds (it is difficult to reconstitute homogeneous statistics for the period prior to unification), and for a more fundamental reason: the two parts of Germany have followed two very different social models. The comparison therefore concerns two countries based on a western social model: France and the former FRG. The analysis of cause- and age-specific mortality was continued until 1995 because the conditions prevailing before unification continued to shape mortality trends for several years afterwards.

Beyond the general indicator of life expectancy, which reveals identical overall trends in France and the former FRG, does the same rule apply to all aspects of mortality, notably with respect to age or cause of death? We will start by exploring the reasons for the interruption in the decline in infant mortality in the former FRG between 1968 and 1973. We will then focus on the similarities and differences in mortality from infectious diseases, violent causes and degenerative pathologies. Lastly, the differences between men and women that may appear when comparing mortality in the two countries will also be examined.

I. General observations and limitations of the study

The similarity of overall mortality trends in the two countries conceals substantial age-specific variations (Figure 1). The differences are clearly visible. Before age 45 for males and before age 30 for females, mortality has fallen more in the former FRG than in France since 1975, whereas above these ages, progress has been greater in France throughout the period.

This pattern is not surprising, since statistics for the whole of western Europe from 1950 to 1995 show that the growing convergence of life expectancies has in fact been accompanied (since 1965 at least) by a relative resistance to decline in the mortality of young people in Mediterranean Europe and of old people in northern Europe (Meslé and Vallin, 2002). But given the growing similarity between the living conditions of the population in the two countries and the increasing interpenetration of their political, economic and social organization, the true scale of the phenomenon deserves closer examination.

Indices and data sources

The present study is limited to the major groups of causes of death at age O and in broad age groups. The population used to calculate standardized rates by age groups and for all ages is the European standard population used in the directory of world health statistics published each year by the World Health Organization up to 1996. Seven major groups of causes of death, with a few sub-divisions, are given: infectious diseases, diseases of the respiratory system, cancers, diseases of the circulatory system including cerebrovascular diseases, diseases of the digestive system including cirrhosis of the liver, violent deaths (suicides, road traffic accidents and other violent deaths), senility and ill-defined causes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Cause-Specific Mortality in France and in the Former FRG, 1950-95: Similarities and Differences
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.