Influence the Election, Volunteer Now

By Hall, Robert A. | VFW Magazine, October 1996 | Go to article overview

Influence the Election, Volunteer Now


Hall, Robert A., VFW Magazine


We the People, an election year series, is devoted to how government works. Each month. VFW magazine will present a feature describing how and why your participation in the political process is vital.

There is no time like the present to make grassroots democracy work. Only your personal involvement can assure genuine good government.

For politicians, feedback on how they are doing is quantifiable and frequent - votes are counted every two or four years and the tallies are final. Somewhere on election day this November, a legislative friend of the VFW will be defeated for re-election because of lack of support. Don't let it be your legislator.

Election day is almost upon us. Candidates are making their final efforts. Volunteers and money are needed today.

Wise voters choose their preferred candidates on a wide range of issues including the candidates' character and ability. A legislator's willingness to face down powerful and well-financed groups on behalf of your cause has to be a telling argument, though it may not be the only factor on which you will base a decision to support a candidate.

You should already know how your legislators stand on veterans issues from your meetings with them. If you haven't met with your legislators, the VFW Action Corps can provide you with a list of who they are, how they stand on your issues and who's up for re-election.

You can bet that some of the legislators who support the VFW have election opponents who are receiving heavy contributions and support from groups opposing critical veterans issues.

Whoever you are supporting, now is the time to step forward. …

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