International Economic Law and Armed Conflict

The George Washington Journal of International Law and Economics, January 1, 1995 | Go to article overview

International Economic Law and Armed Conflict


International Economic Law and Armed Conflict, edited by Harry H.G. Post. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1994. Pp. 215. $93.00 (hardcover).

International Economic Law and Armed Conflict revolves around three essays dealing with the relationship between armed conflict and international economic law, with particular attention to the increased role of the United Nations Security Council. International legal scholars wrote the essays and the comments following them.

Wolff Heintschel von Heinegg wrote the first essay, entitled "The Current State of International Prize Law." First, the essay gives a brief history of international prize law since 1945 by covering the practice of prize law during different conflicts and evaluating the rules of prize law as given by military manuals. The author concludes by giving a summary of the rules of international prize law. The second section of the essay is a discussion of the restrictions that international law and the United Nations Charter have placed on international prize law. The section addresses two issues: ( 1 ) the impact of the United Nations Charter use of force provisions upon prize law; and (2) whether prize law applies only during states of war or during any armed conflicts.

Andrea Gioia, senior researcher and acting professor of international law at the University of Trent, Italy, wrote "Neutrality and Non-Belligerency." The first section of the essay analyzes the concept of neutrality in international law and briefly discusses the history and purposes of neutrality in international armed conflicts, as well as changes in its definition.

The second section of the essay asks whether states have a choice in adopting neutrality or nonbelligerency in times of international conflict. It examines the Charter of the United Nations, as well as its nonbinding recommendations and binding decisions regarding the appropriate status of states during armed conflicts. …

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