"All the News That's Fit to Print"-Et Cetera

By Levinson, Martin H. | et Cetera, Winter 1997 | Go to article overview

"All the News That's Fit to Print"-Et Cetera


Levinson, Martin H., et Cetera


I'VE LONG APPRECIATED the message implied in the famous New York Times slogan "All the News That's Fit to Print." It seems to me an elegant expression of the high standards set by the Times and it suggests that other papers are probably publishing news that's not fit to print. It does what a slogan is supposed to do (at least according to my Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary) - characterizes a stand or goal to be achieved as well as performing as a brief attention-getting phrase used in promotion. From time to time I've wondered about what sorts of slogans other papers use and if they suggested themes which could be categorized in a meaningful way.

On a Sunday in June, 1996 I visited Hotaling's News Agency, which is located at 142 West 42nd Street in New York City. Hotaling's claims to carry more than 200 out-oftown newspapers. My plan was to write down the slogans found on the front pages of those newspapers and to see if I could logically categorize them. Unfortunately, my data gathering objective became problematic because the newspapers are located behind a counter which is not accessible to the public. Fortunately Stephen Harris of Hotaling's agreed, in between serving customers, to hand me copies of the various papers to look at. I chose to record front page slogans, rather than those on the editorial page, because I think front page slogans declare a message that is meant for everyone rather than just buyers of the newspaper.

I was able, in approximately two hours, to review the front pages from well over a hundred newspapers and, though many of them have no slogan, I was able to record over 50 from those that do. I have used 34 of these slogans in this article (I omitted using the others because they were duplicative). After scrutinizing my collected slogans I formulated seven categories which I believe indicate particular themes. I will briefly discuss each category and offer relevant examples at the end of each discussion. I have used slogans only from American newspapers (with one exception that can be found at the end of the article).

I. Big is Better

In a capitalist-oriented economy it is almost axiomatic that bigger is better. The very fact your organization is large bespeaks a certain level of success. I believe some additional inferences contained in the newspaper slogans below are: because we're big we have more staff to bring you more news; lots of people obviously find something they like in our paper (fifty million Frenchmen can't be wrong); we're influential; we're trustworthy (if we weren't we wouldn't have such a large readership). My favorite slogan in this group is the one from the Cincinnati Enquirer. Do they really have 501,100 readers?

Slogans

USA Today-"No. 1 in the USA ... First in Daily Readers" The Cincinnati Enquirer-"A Gannett Newspaper501,100 Readers Daily"

The Seattle Times - "Washington's Largest Newspaper"

Cleveland Plain-Dealer- "Ohio's Largest Newspaper"

The State (Columbia) - "South Carolina's Largest Newspaper"

II. We Have Experience

I could have included many other examples in this well represented category. Newspapers that have been around awhile are proud of their longevity. This is probably even truer today since the newspaper business is "downsizing" and many papers are either going out of business or merging. It can be inferred that newspapers that have been around a long time are delivering a "tried and true" service. I found interesting the slogan distinction between The Augusta Chronicle and The Post and Courier.

Slogans

The Augusta Chronicle (Georgia) - "The South's Oldest Paper"

The Post and Courier (Charleston, South Carolina) - "The South's Oldest Daily Newspaper"

The Daily Oklahoman - "The State Newspaper Since 1907"

St. Paul Pioneer Press - "Minnesota's First Newspaper"

Mobile Register- "Alabama's Oldest Newspaper"

III. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

"All the News That's Fit to Print"-Et Cetera
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.