Editorial

By Thomas, Glyn | Australian Journal of Outdoor Education, January 1, 2005 | Go to article overview

Editorial


Thomas, Glyn, Australian Journal of Outdoor Education


Welcome to the 2nd edition of volume nine of the Australian Journal of Outdoor Education. This edition brings a diverse range of content from authors across the globe. My apologies for the delay in this edition of the journal, and it has been caused by the unpredictable flow of submissions and the necessary nature of the blind review process.

This editon opens with a paper called, "'If you don't mind going places without a map, follow me:' Re-stor(y)ing of self, place and educator." The author, Genny Blades, recounts a story of re-connection after some significant changes in her life. Genny uses poetry as a way of telling her story in this autoethnographic, narrative paper.

In the second paper, Robyn Zink from Monash University in Victoria draws on the work of Foucault to explore the complexities and contradictions in some outdooor education practice. Robyn encourages practitioners to seriously consider the learning that may be present in student feedback regardless of how trivial or flippant it may seem.

The next paper, "Turbulent times: Outdoor education in Great Britain 1993-2003," provides an interesting synopsis of some of the recent influences on outdoor education practice in the UK. Specifically, Pete Higgins and John Telford reflect on the way a kayaking tragedy in 1993 has shaped legislation and practice. The authors also discuss some implications for outdoor education becoming a profession.

Marc Bellette, from Melbourne University, provides a research report exploring the way students learn navigation and respond to assessment. The research was conducted with emerging outdoor leaders from La Trobe university, when Marc was working as a lecturer. Marc's paper describes how he used a quantititive methodology to assess deep, surface, and strategic approaches to learning. …

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