Studies in Anglican History: An Overview

By Williams, Peter W. | Anglican and Episcopal History, June 2006 | Go to article overview

Studies in Anglican History: An Overview


Williams, Peter W., Anglican and Episcopal History


Studies in Anglican History, Champaign, Illinois: University of Illinois Press

This monograph series is designed to serve the wider field of religious history as well as the Episcopal Church. Dealing with all aspects of the history of the Anglican community of churches, it is characterized by the best in contemporary international scholarship. This series includes the following titles.

JOHN F. WOOLVERTON, The Education of Phillip Brooks. $22.50.

The Education of Phillip Brooks probes the formative years of one of the best-known figures of Victorian America's "Gilded Age." Rigorously researched, bringing as yet untapped archival material into play, Woolverton's book is an extremely readable and fascinating look at a gifted, persuasive clergyman and public figure. One of the most influential ministers of his time, Brooks delivered the sermon over the body of Abraham Lincoln at Independence Hall in Philadelphia. And he is known for penning the lyrics to "O Little Town of Bethlehem."

ROBERT W. PRICHARD, THe Nature of Salvation: Theological Consensus in the Episcopal Church, 1801-73. $29.95.

Robert Prichard examines both high-church and evangelical theology in the nineteenth-century Episcopal Church, claiming a commonality between the two that has been neglected in the study of Anglican history. Parting company with the interpretation dominant among historians of the Episcopal Church for more than sixty years, Prichard focuses on shared theological assumptions rather than on liturgical divisions.

PETER IVER KAUFMAN, Prayer, Despair, and Drama: Elizabethan Introspection. $24.95.

Prayer, Despair, and Drama explores the godly sorrow of Elizabethan Calvinists and finds that what some have characterized as an evangelism of fear functioned more as a kind of religious therapy. In this major contribution to discussions of the relationship between religion and literature in Elizabethan England, Kaufman argues that the soul-searching and selfscourging typical of late Tudor Calvinism was reflected in the rhetoric of self-loathing then prevalent in sermons, sonnets, and soliloquies. Kaufman shows how this spiritual psychology informs major literary texts including Hamlet, The Faerie Queene, Donne's Holy Sonnets, and other works. …

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