Religion and Mass Media: Audiences and Adaptations

By Mason, Debra L. | Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly, Autumn 1996 | Go to article overview

Religion and Mass Media: Audiences and Adaptations


Mason, Debra L., Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly


Religion and Mass Media: Audiences and Adaptations. Daniel A. Stout and Judith Buddenbaum, eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 1996. 294 pp. $40 hbk. $25 pbk.

At last. That is how mass communication scholars interested in the relationship between religion and the mass media might well react to this volume's examination of religion and the media. The book attempts to provide some common ground between mass communication researchers and sociologists, important because even together the two disciplines still have only a meager number of studies about the mass media audience and religion.

Stout and Buddenbaum gathered eclectic articles by authors both theological and secular; both sociologists and communication researchers. The book is well-organized in five parts: part 1 is a review of theoretical frameworks and past research; part 2 discusses what some faiths teach members about the media; part 3 details results from empirical audience studies not tied to a denomination; part 4 includes case studies of how some religious groups define the media's role in everyday life; and part 5 discusses implications of the dialogue about media and religion in the emerging information society.

As with any compilation of previous research, the chapters vary in methodologies and quality. But overall the book is impressive for the editors' clear analysis and discussion, which help put the disparate topics into a helpful structural framework. The literature review and chapters reviewing the perspectives of Roman Catholics, mainline Protestants, Evangelicals, and Fundamentalists could be faulted for their lack of specificity, except that such content has never been gathered in one place before, making it "must" reading for anyone first approaching the study of religion and media. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Religion and Mass Media: Audiences and Adaptations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.