Towards Inclusive Trade Policy

By Domeisen, Natalie | International Trade Forum, January 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

Towards Inclusive Trade Policy


Domeisen, Natalie, International Trade Forum


A new balance of voices is emerging in advocacy for trade. In the area of trade policy, it ranges from small business coalitions to non-governmental organizations (NGOs), media, international agencies, academics, big business and more. All these voices are needed to shape a more inclusive trade policy and move closer to achieving the development promise of the Doha Development Agenda.

Voices featured in this issue:

5 Humanizing Globalization

Has globalization made the rich richer and the poor poorer? WTO leader Pascal Lamy argues that globalization needs reform, with more emphasis on sustainable economic and social development.

7 Good Governance Opens New Doors to Advocacy

In trade policy, good governance is based on models that are open, fair and inclusive, says an expert on trade talks advocacy, Professor Michel Kostecki.

10 Uganda's Services Coalition Finds Strength in Numbers

Small firms may find they are too stretched to monitor developments in regional and international trade talks. This case from Uganda shows how forming a coalition is giving service firms a collective voice, resources and influence with trade negotiators.

12 Giving Voice to the "Silent Majority"

The challenge to building business advocacy is to develop business-government dialogue but also to bring in small firms, the informal sector and other parts of society, said 120 participants at the latest Business for Development meeting, held in Hong Kong in December.

13 The Trade Debate Needs the Voice of Business

Concluding the Doha round successfully will be difficult without a shift in public opinion, says the Evian Group, a protrade coalition. Generally speaking, people in rich countries see trade and globalization as a threat to jobs, while poor countries are disappointed that Doha is not helping enough to reduce poverty in the short term. …

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