The Green Room

The Virginia Quarterly Review, Winter 1997 | Go to article overview

The Green Room


"Here's a marvellous convenient place for our rehearsal."

During Virginia's short-lived era of "Massive Resistance" to school desegregation in the late 1950's, no area of the Commonwealth resisted more massively-or longer-than Prince Edward County, where the schools were closed not for days or weeks but for years-from 1958 to 1964. An eyewitness to Prince Edward's resistance was Norfolk newspaperman R. C. (BoB) SMITH who recounted this sad episode of Virginia history in a book, They Closed Their Schools, published by the University of North Carolina Press in 1965. The book, long out of print, was recently republished by the Martha E. Forester Council of Women of Prince Edward County with proceeds from the sale going to the drive to turn Moton High School into a civil rights museum. That drive reflects the sea change in Prince Edward County in the decades since Massive Resistance died out. MR. SMITH'S essay describes that change.

He wrote his book originally while working as an editorial writer for the Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk, Virginia. He later became associate editor of the Charlotte, N.C. News in 1964 and served four years before leaving the newspaper business to pursue other writing interests. MR. SMITH'S most recent book is A Case About Amy (Temple University Press), a story of a deaf child's family's efforts to get a sign language interpreter for her in classes with hearing children. MR. SMITH now lives in Jamestown, NC.

RAWDON DALRYMPLE is well qualified to write about recent developments in Australia, particularly in its foreign policy, since he spent a long and distinguished career as an Australian diplomat. A native of New South Wales, MR. DALRYMPLE graduated from the University of Sydney in 1952 and then went to University College, Oxford as an Australian Rhodes Scholar. He received a first-class degree in politics, philosophy, and economics in 1954. He joined the Australian foreign office in 1957 and served in embassies in Bonn, Manila, and Djakarta before becoming ambassador to Israel in 1972. He was later the Australian ambassador to Indonesia and to the United States. He ended his career as the Australian ambassador to Japan. He is now affiliated with his alma mater, the University of Sydney.

A native of Alabama, MICHAEL KNIGHT is making his VQR debut, but his fiction has already appeared or is forthcoming in Playboy, where his story won the 1996 Playboy College Fiction Contest, Paris Review, Shenandoah, The Crescent Review, Blue Penny Quarterly, and will be anthologized this Spring in Scribner's Best of The Fiction Workshops and Crosscurrents: Best Of The Net. "Amelia Earhart's Coat" will be included in his short story collection, tentatively titled Dogfight, which is due out next year from Dutton. Mr. Knight received an M.F.A. degree last year from the University of Virginia and is a former fiction reader for VQR. He is currently serving as the Reginald S. Tickner Writing Fellow at the Gilman School in Baltimore.

A regular contributor to VQR SANFORD PINSKER is a professor of English at Franklin & Marshall College in Pennsylvania. His most recent books include Oedipus Meets the Press (Mellon Poetry series, 1996) and Worrying About Race, 1985-1995: Reflections During a Troubled Time (Whitston 1996).

One of America's most prolific and praised poets, CHARLES WRIGHT'S most recent poetry collection, his 11th, was Chickamauga, published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux last year. He teaches at the University of Virginia.

LARISSA SZPORLUK is the author of Prowler's Universe, her first collection published last year by Graywolf. Her poems have appeared in numerous magazines.

JANE SHORE'S poems in this issue are from her third collection, Music Minus One, which appears this year from Picador. She teaches at George Washington University and lives in Washington, DC and in Vermont.

HENRY HART is the author of The Poetry of Geoffrey Hill, Seamus Heaney: Poet of Contrary Progressions, and Robert Lowell and the Sublime. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Green Room
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.