Asa's Winning Combination

Aging Today, May/June 2006 | Go to article overview

Asa's Winning Combination


The American Society on Aging (ASA) board of directors presented its major awards for 2006 at the association's recent conference in Anaheim, Calif.

Lynn Friss Feinberg, at left in photo, received the ASA Leadership Award, presented to a member who has made significant contributions to the growth and development of ASA and the field of aging. Feinberg is deputy director of the National Center on Caregiving, a program of the San Francisco-based Family Caregiver Alliance. She also directs the National Consensus Project for Caregiver Assessment and is coinvestigator for a longitudinal study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health to develop interventions for caregiver mental health. Recently, she directed the first 50-state study on caregiving programs in the United States, funded by the U.S. Administration on Aging.

Honored with this year's ASA Hall of Fame Award was Robert H. Binstock, center, Professor of Aging, Health and Society at case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland. Supported by the Atlantic Philanthropies, this award recognizes an older ASA member who, through lifetime advocacy and leadership, enhances the lives of older adults. Binstock has been a leading political scientist in aging for more than four decades. (see his article on page 3 of this issue; essays by other winners will appear in later issues of Aging Today.) A former president of the Gerontological Society of America, Binstock has served as director of a White House Task Force'on Older Americans. Among his 24 authored and edited books are the Handbook of Aging and the Social Sciences, sixth edition (San Diego: Elsevier/Academic Press, 2006), and The Fountain of Youth: Cultural, Scientific and Ethical Perspectives on a Biomedical Goal (New York City: Oxford University Press, 2004). …

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