Open House


Letters from our readers

San Francisco Bay: Cleaner and more accessible

Thank you for illuminating some of the many treasures in and around the West Coast's largest estuary, San Francisco Bay ("Bringing Back the Bay," January, page 12, Northern California edition). The bay's 450 square miles of open water and wetlands support more than 750 species of fish, animals, and birds, but boasted even greater splendor before development, dredging, and landfill reduced the bay's size by one third.

Decades of effective citizen advocacy helped clean up raw sewage and shoreline dumps that polluted the bay, and boosted public access from only 6 miles of shoreline in 1960 to 178 miles today. To explore the bay's scenic splendor, join one of our Discover the Bay outings or pitch in to help restore wetlands. Call (510) 452-9261 or www.savesfbay.org.

David Lewis, Executive Director

SAVE THE BAY, OAKLAND

A rave review from France Re: Chocolate-Caramel Trifle with Raspberries, November, page 171. This is a great dessert! I've already made it three times, and each time is better than the one before. Usually my guests don't believe it comes from an American magazine till I show them the page.

Marguerite Czarnecki

CHATENAY- MALABRY, FRANCE

A merry aloha from Hawaii The Campbell family had a lovely time making aloha shirts for the Christmas tree this year. To your fun idea ("Aloha Shirt Ornaments," December, page 104) we added some surfer shorts, as you see in the picture.

Susan M. Campbell

KAILUA, HI

She loves sconce lighting, but wants to save money

I read the interesting article "Luminous Walls" (January, page 84). My house on Whidbey Island, Washington, is almost exclusively lighted by wall sconces. I love the warm, indirect light they emit. Do compact fluorescent bulbs work in sconces controlled by dimmer switches? …

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Open House
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