Quick Recovery

By Bowling, Mary Jo | Sunset, March 2002 | Go to article overview

Quick Recovery


Bowling, Mary Jo, Sunset


Before & After

New upholstery, a few pillows, and well-chosen color make redecorating simple

* One of the most effective ways to create a fresh look for your interior is to give your old furniture a face-lift with new pillows or upholstery. That was the case with Kimberly Tucci's sofa and chairs. The frames were still sturdy, with years left in them, but the large-patterned fabric and pillows that covered them looked messy and dated. Interior designer Eugenia Jesberg came to the rescue with a consistent color palette that unified the room and gave the furniture a more tailored look.

Tucci's two rattan chairs were purchased at a flea market; the original pillows were long gone and in their place sat bed pillows wrapped in fabric. With use, the pillows had disintegrated into down puddles, which made sitting in the chairs uncomfortable.

"The frames on the rattan chairs were of good quality. They still had their original paint, which is a little weathered and gives them charm. But the pillows made the chairs look like an unmade bed," says Jesberg. "All I needed to do was upgrade the cushions."

She replaced the worn-out pillows with tailored cushions made of a foam core wrapped in down. The combination lets people have it both ways: The foam keeps the cushion upright and helps it hold its shape, while the down makes a comfortable seat and softens the severe line of the foam.

The repetition of shapes, colors, and forms holds the room together. Jesberg carried the vertical and horizontal lines of the rattan into the striped upholstery: The cushion sides have short, vertical stripes; the seats and backs have long, horizontal stripes. Look closely and you see the same lines in the chair bases.

"Traditionally, stripes run vertically on upholstered pieces," says Jesberg. "Changing the direction gave the chairs a more contemporary look."

A trimmer-looking armchair

Before, the armchair looked huge because of its cabbage rose-printed fabric. The loose slipcover did not help.

Jesberg reupholstered it in vertical stripes and welting (cording covered in fabric) to sharpen and slim its outline. "I use welting and other kinds of trims to call attention to the shape of the piece, to make it more crisp," she says. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Quick Recovery
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.