Comment on Ofsted: Evaluating Mathematics Provision for 14 - 19-Year-Olds

By Jones, Margaret | Mathematics Teaching, July 2006 | Go to article overview

Comment on Ofsted: Evaluating Mathematics Provision for 14 - 19-Year-Olds


Jones, Margaret, Mathematics Teaching


It was a pleasure to read a report with which I felt in whole-hearted agreement. The report is intended to contribute to the debate on 14-19 mathematics following the publication of the Smith Report. The basic finding linked to previous findings across all key stages, although the focus is definitely 14-19. Positive elements that resonated with my own perception of good teaching in this age range were:

* The importance of good quality teaching that promoted learning that stimulated students to think for themselves;

* The need to give a coherent picture of mathematical ideas - the 'big picture' that is often cited;

* Questioning to identify and rectify mathematical misconceptions and the use of incorrect answers to develop understanding.

Elements that resonated with my view of the problems were:

* A lack in some areas of the country of suitably qualified teachers;

* Presenting mathematics as a collection of arbitrary rules did not motivate students and also limited their achievement;

* Ineffective questioning that failed to identify errors and misconceptions;

* Lack of imagination or confidence to try new approaches;

* A narrow focus on exam requirements meant students were not prepared for further study. A number of recommendations are made:

* First, that the DfES and QCA ensure the revision of GCSE and A level mathematics results in exams that encourage effective understanding and problem-solving;

* The DfES should continue to invest in the dissemination of good practice; and encourage more use of the subject coaching programmes and networks in both schools and colleges; (I see here a role for the newly formed National Centre for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics (NCETM))

Finally schools and colleges should:

* Promote the development of teachers' subject knowledge and active styles of teaching;

* Develop effective informal assessment systems, questioning that promotes an immediate response to identified difficulties;

* Capitalize on ICT developments;

* At Key Stage 4, focus on the development of pupils' understanding in order to prepare them for further study. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Comment on Ofsted: Evaluating Mathematics Provision for 14 - 19-Year-Olds
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.