Diversity Training: Conceptual Issues and Practices for Canadian Clinical Psychology Programs

By E A Meyen Hertzsprung; Dobson, Keith S | Canadian Psychology, August 2000 | Go to article overview

Diversity Training: Conceptual Issues and Practices for Canadian Clinical Psychology Programs


E A Meyen Hertzsprung, Dobson, Keith S, Canadian Psychology


Abstract

This article presents recent arguments about the need for sensitivity to diversity issues in psychological practice, and for training programs to attend to these issues. The results of a survey related to the extent and nature of diversity training in Canadian clinical psychology programs are presented, in which diversity was defined broadly as reflecting the vast number of possible individual differences (e.g., culture, nationality, ethnicity, colour, race, gender, religion, sexual preference, disability, economic disadvantage) that can affect clinical psychology knowledge, research, and practice. Directors of Clinical Training (DCrs) at all Canadian clinical psychology programs were asked about the extent to which various aspects of diversity training were deemed important or essential to their program, what training activities were required, and how effective different methods of training were viewed. The results revealed that DCTs varied widely in their opinion of how important diversity materials were, and that few programs require many different methods of training related to diversity. Further, the training methods more commonly adopted did not generally relate well with those that were seen as being most effective. Implications of the survey for training in clinical psychology are provided.

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Harre, R. …

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