A.T. Kearney Unit Changes Name, Plans Expansion

By Ruiz, Gina | Workforce Management, July 31, 2006 | Go to article overview

A.T. Kearney Unit Changes Name, Plans Expansion


Ruiz, Gina, Workforce Management


EXECUTIVE SEARCH

The firm A.T. Kearney Executive Search has changed its name to Edward W. Kelley & Partners Ltd. and is opening offices in Boston; Calgary, Alberta; Sydney and Melbourne, Australia; Moscow; and Vienna, Austria. The changes come six months after the firm's management buyhack from Texas-based Electronic Data Systems Corp.

Industry veteran Edward KeIIcy, former president and board member of Korn/Ferry International's European operations, heads the new organization. Kelley says the company will pursue an aggressive growth strategy, doubling in size during the next 12 months.

Opening up opportunities under a new brand, however, could be challenging in the short term, notes Christopher Hunt of Hunt-Scanlon Corp., a market research firm in Stamford, Connecticut.

"The A.T. Kearney brand holds a lot of weight and recognition," he says. "Rebuilding that level of awareness is not going to happen overnight." A.T. Kearney Executive Search was founded in 1946 and generated $40 million in worldwide revenue last year, according to Hunt.

Hunt nevertheless anticipates a relatively smooth transition with minimal impact on business volume since a core group of consultants will remain with the new entity. Kelly has also assembled a senior management team composed of well-known players in their respective markets.

Mark Smith, head of the company's Boston office, has more than 18 years of executive search experience, having been a partner at Battalia Winston International's Wellesley, Massachusetts, office and as managing director for Korn/Ferry's Boston office. …

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