Cold-Eeze Lozenges Are Taking the Nation by Storm

By Snyder, Karyn | Drug Topics, February 3, 1997 | Go to article overview

Cold-Eeze Lozenges Are Taking the Nation by Storm


Snyder, Karyn, Drug Topics


Every winter, Americans expect colds to spread like wildfire but never consider that a cold remedy could catch on just as quickly. But such is the case with Cold-Eeze, a lozenge that's being touted as the answer to prevention and reduction of cold symptoms. The remedy is so popular that many drugstores are having difficulty keeping it on the shelves.

Cold-Eeze is a homeopathic lozenge proven effective in reducing the duration of the common cold and the severity of symptoms. Manufactured by Quigley Corp., a small company based in Doylestown, Pa., the product had been selling well on the home-shopping channel QVC for several years. Demand for the product soared following its national launch in retail stores and was further aided by a Cleveland Clinic study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Michael Macknin, M.D., who led the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, found that patients who used Cold-Eeze recovered from their colds in 4.4 days, while patients using a placebo took 7.6 days to get over their symptoms. The Cold-Eeze group also reported less severe symptoms.

The key to Cold-Eeze's efficacy seems to be the 11.5 mg of zinc in each lozenge. Its maker believes that zinc ions "put a temporary clamp on critical nerve endings," shutting down congestion and postnasal drip. Furthermore, the negatively charged ions of the cold virus lock onto the positively charged zinc ions instead of the positively charged ions covering the cells in the nose.

Quigley recommends that people begin using Cold-Eeze at the first signs of a cold, claiming that a day of treatment can often arrest it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cold-Eeze Lozenges Are Taking the Nation by Storm
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.