Appreciation


You'll never find another voice quite like Lou Rawls's. Whatever he sung, whether it was pop, gospel, blues or jazz, the velvet-voice was instantly recognizable. Rawls died Jan. 6 at the age of 72 in Los Angeles of brain and lung cancer.

Like many of his peers, Rawls started singing in church. His gospel roots prepared him for the rigors of life as an R&B singer in the 1960s. Rawls recorded more than 60 albums throughout his nearly five-decade career, winning three Grammy awards. The baritone, however, was best known for the 1976 mega-hit, "You'll Never Find Another Love Like Mine." That same year, Rawls was tapped as a spokesman for Anheuser-Busch.

But Rawls was more than a talented singer. In 1977, he became the spokesman for the United Negro College Fund, using his unique position to establish the Parade of Stars in 1979. The nationally televised annual telethon features the most popular Black entertainers and has helped raise more than $200 million for students at private historically Black colleges.

Wilson Pickett didn't just sing a song. He sang a song. His voice, as gritty as the cotton fields of his native Alabama, touched the souls of a generation. Pickett died of a heart attack at the age of 64, Jan. 19 in Reston, Va.

Like his counterpart Otis Redding, Pickett helped define "soul" music during the tumultuous '60s. His rambunctious, gospel-inspired delivery earned him the nickname, "Wicked Pickett" as he performed hits such as "In the Midnight Hour," "Mustang Sally" and "Land of 1,000 Dances." Pickett was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1991 and continued to tour and perform until 2004.

As half of the dancing duo, the Nicholas Brothers, Fayard Nicholas dazzled audiences with his skillful, acrobatic dance moves and inspired generations of dancers, including Gregory Hines and Savion Glover. He died Jan. 24 of pneumonia and complications from a stroke in Toluca Lake, Calif. He was 91.

Nicholas, along with his brother Harold, took dance to a whole new level during the 1930s and '40s. The Nicholas Brothers headlined at the famed Cotton Club and later tap-danced, back-flipped and split their way in to more than 30 movies.

Fayard Nicholas was the older of the two and choreographed most of their routines. One of their most renowned dance numbers was in the 1943 all-Black musical, Stormy Weather which featured Lena Home and legendary tap dancer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. In 1989, Nicholas won a Tony award for his choreography of the musical, Black and Blue. The brothers were honored by the Kennedy Center for their achievements in 1991. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Appreciation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.