IRAN: Eternal Iran: Continuity and Chaos

By Sadri, Houman A. | The Middle East Journal, Summer 2006 | Go to article overview

IRAN: Eternal Iran: Continuity and Chaos


Sadri, Houman A., The Middle East Journal


IRAN Eternal Iran: Continuity and Chaos, by Patrick Clawson and Michael Rubin. New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2005. ix + 162 pages. Notes p. 195. Index to p. 203. $24.95.

In Eternal Iran, Patrick Clawson and Michael Rubin discuss the history of modern Iran, focusing on the strengths and deficiencies of its leaders and institutions, in addition to the views of the regime's defenders and critics. Known for their strong policy background, the authors concentrate on the causes and effects of the Iranian policymaking machine's interacting with a number of domestic and international variables. The book concludes with a summary of the main arguments followed by three scenarios about Tehran's prospects for the future.

Clawson and Rubin divide this book into nine easy-to-read chapters, which are aimed for the general public. Eternal Iran begins by highlighting the uniqueness of Iran in comparison to its neighbors as well as its significance as a regional power and for the West. They correctly point to the contradictions that have existed in Iranian society for centuries and that have continued and widened under the Islamic Republic. In chapter 1, the authors examine Iran's social history in order to uncover the roots of Iranian politics and policies. In chapter 2, they trace the historical development of Iran from the establishment of the Persian Empire (559 BC) to the end of the Safavid Empire in 1736. The next chapter covers the Qajar period (1781-1925), which is often associated with Iran's decline, though the authors cleverly claim that the Qajar Kings were not given enough credit for starting the modernization process. Chapter 4 examines the Pahlavi Dynasty from Reza Khan's emergence in 1921 as the preeminent political figure in Iran to the CIA-supported 1953 coup (p. 65) against Prime Minister Muhammad Musaddiq.

In chapter 5, the authors discuss Iran's rapid economic development process during the period 1953-1978, when the Shah both modernized and Westernized the country. However, as the authors emphasize, the Shah failed to match such efforts with political modernization (p. 85). In chapter 6, Clawson and Rubin investigate the Khomeini era (1979-1989), known as the "First Islamic Republic," a period that includes significant events from the Islamic Revolution to the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988), which devastated the economy. The next chapter concentrates on the "Second Islamic Republic" (1989-2005), when Khomeini's successors attempted to put their own stamp on Iranian politics, although they did not enjoy either Ayatollah Khomeini's charisma or his legitimacy (p. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

IRAN: Eternal Iran: Continuity and Chaos
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.