Opening Career Options for All Students

By Clark, Sylvia | Techniques, March 1997 | Go to article overview

Opening Career Options for All Students


Clark, Sylvia, Techniques


Looking for some direction on career guidance programs? Here are four national models with some useful ideas.

IN THIS REPORT

Four programs in Texas have been recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and the National Center for Research in Vocational Education as exemplary career guidance and counseling programs. In the following article, Sylvia Clark discusses their outstanding practices.

Kathy Jo Elliott, field editor of this Insider, is tech prep/student resource center coordinator at Green Country Area Vo-Tech School in Okmulgee, Oklahoma

The nationwide search for exemplary career guidance and counseling programs conducted by the U.S. Department of Education and the National Center for Research in Vocational Education recognized four programs in Texas: Garland and Katy school districts in 1995 and Birdville school district and Houston's Shared Counselor Partnership program at North Harris College in 1996. Using the state's recommended K-12 guidance program, these programs provide a strong career development component to ensure that every student's educational experiences meet academic and career goals.

Early in 1991, Texas identified seven career pathways for use as a guidance tool to help students and their parents develop graduation plans. The plans are designed to prepare students for the working world or further education upon high school graduation.

Career and technology education state directors identified the following career pathways: agricultural science and technology; art, communications and media technology; business and marketing; health science technology; human development, management and services; industrial and engineering technology; and personal and protective services. School districts may identify their own pathways as long as they are broad enough to teach all aspects of the given industry but not so broad as to replicate general education.

The seven pathways are broad areas of study that are flexible and overlapping, which allows students to move in many directions within the pathway as new knowledge and experiences affect career interests. The flexibility of the pathways allows for adaptation to the changing needs of the world they are about to enter.

Pathways increase a student's options and provide a focus and relevance to education that is often missing in the "shopping mall" style of course selection so common to U. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Opening Career Options for All Students
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.