Appraising Employee Performance

By Javitch, David | Management Services, Autumn 2006 | Go to article overview

Appraising Employee Performance


Javitch, David, Management Services


Taking time to review your employees is important to their success and the success of your company. Follow these tips for developing effective appraisals.

Business owners have been evaluating the performance of their employees for as long as businesses have existed. But not all entrepreneurs take the time to review their employees, and even when they do, the reviews are often done in a haphazard way or on an irregular basis or are instigated only after a negative action on the part of the employee. These type of encounters are rarely productive because they usually only afford the boss an opportunity to 'get something off their chest'.

A performance appraisal can be a powerful tool for any entrepreneur who wants to get the most out of every encounter with their employees. So why is this process important and how can you best use these sessions to your advantage?

First, a regularly scheduled feedback session, whether done quarterly or annually, gives your employees a planned and anticipated opportunity to address key issues with you. It also provides a time for you to interact with your employees one on one to evaluate their strengths, limitations and growth potential. Third, this conversation serves as the time to discuss potential financial rewards and promotions, which can be a source of increased job interest on the part of your employees. If promotion isn't an option at this time, you can outline the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary for advancement and future potential with your company. This 'career pathing' information can help both you and your employees gauge just what's needed to move on to the next step, responsibilities, job level, within your company.

So how do you start the performance appraisal process? The basic tool and source of information for the interaction is an employee's job description. Unfortunately, in many jobs, this document either doesn't exist or only vaguely describes an employee's current job. Therefore, before proceeding with the performance appraisal interview, you need to sit down and develop a job description that accurately reflects an employee's responsibilities. The basic parts of this document are: the job title and responsibilities, reporting relationships, financial responsibilities (if any), usual and customary job requirements and activities, and performance standards.

Armed with this data, you have a foundation, format and criteria for creating the performance appraisal tool. At least one week prior to the interview, you need to provide the employee being reviewed with their written job description and a blank copy of the performance appraisal questionnaire. If the latter doesn't exist, then the job description can serve as the skeletal outline for the interview.

During the review, which will be a two-way exchange of information between you and your employee, the following tips need to be followed to help ensure an effective meeting:

* The purpose of the interview is to have an open dialog between you and your employee. To achieve that goal, you should begin by trying to put the employee at ease. Chances are, both you and your employee may be anxious, so starting off with small talk or generalisations may lighten the mood.

* Allow the employee to share their feedback before you volunteer your perspective. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Appraising Employee Performance
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.