Time for a New Trope

By Donlon, J. P. | Chief Executive (U.S.), September 2006 | Go to article overview

Time for a New Trope


Donlon, J. P., Chief Executive (U.S.)


CNBC's "Street Signs" asked me to appear on their program commenting on a Slate.com article, "The CEO Real Estate Scam," in which the author, Michelle Leder, expressed outrage that some companies were offering their CEOs "loss protection" and "price protection" based on the value of their homes.

Anchor Erin Burnett, who is also CNBC's co-anchor of "Squawk on the Street," led off by playing to Leder's outrage that CEOs-who can afford it-are given a perk that the average person who is being hurt by falling house prices cannot also enjoy. Leder was indeed infuriated and said so several times. When my turn came I was asked the typical when-have-you-stopped-beating-your-wife question. "Don't you find it infuriating, etc."

I replied that while many perks are open to abuse, not all perquisites are created equal. When attracting a CEO from another company it often makes sense to offer packages that take care of various benefits he or she might otherwise be forced to forego. Indeed, house protection would be cheap as perks go. It hardly rises to the level of Dennis Kozlowski's toga parties or the notorious $6,000 shower curtains, not to mention the use of company jets, Knicks courtside season tickets or daily fresh cut flowers for his New York apartment bestowed upon Jack Welch, former CEO of GE, parent company of CNBC. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Time for a New Trope
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.