Blackout: African American Coaches Remain on the Sidelines

By Wright, Mark W. | The New Crisis, March/April 2002 | Go to article overview

Blackout: African American Coaches Remain on the Sidelines


Wright, Mark W., The New Crisis


When former Baltimore Ravens defensive coordinator Marvin Lewis was hired in the same capacity with the Washington Redskins in January, much was made about the 43-year-old's three-year deal and $850,000 annual salary - it's comparable to what some National Football League (NFL head coaches make and is thought to be at least twice the average for assistant coaches. D Lewis deserve that kind of dough? Sure. His defense broke the singleseason record for fewest points allowed in a 16-game season with 165 (the previous record was 187 held by Chicago) in 2000 en route to the Baltimore Ravens' fmt Super Bowl championship.

What the cynics should have asked was how there could continue to be a dearth of African American head coaches in the NFL and college ranks.

"You know what that Tampa Bay situation comes down to, right?" one sportswriter said recently alluding to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' firing of Tony Dungy, who is Black, in early January and their decision not to hire Lewis after reportedly agreeing to do so. "Tampa could live with firing one African American coach, but couldn't live with replacing him with another. Plain and simple," he said. "It's blatant racism."

If you're keeping count (since Dennis Green was fired in January from the Minnesota Vikings) the 32-team NFL only has two African American head coaches - Herman Edwards, with the New York Jets, and Dungy, who is now with the Indianapolis Colts - while 65 percent of its players are Black.

The NFL's first African American head coach (Hall of Famer Art Shell, formerly of the Oakland Raiders) was hired 13 long years ago. The progress since has been miniscule. The league should be embarrassed - even outraged - by the figures.

For years, the NFL has danced around the subject. The league has been criticized for not opening its doors to African Americans, while leaving those same doors swinging for white coaches who get fired and rehired for job after job, season after season.

As Sean Scanlon, a syndicated sports columnist puts it: "The reason there is a lack of Black coaches in the NFL is because failures and retreads like Dave Wannstedt.. keep getting hired."

At the college level, things are worse.

Thirteen head coaching vacancies were available at the Division I level last fall, a number that didn't go unnoticed by the Black Coaches Association (BCA). At the end of the day, only one African American got the call - one of the few who already had a head coaching job: Tyrone Willingham, formerly of Stanford, will now coach Notre Dame. Willingham's hiring is historic. The twotime PAC-10 Coach of the Year is the first Black coach Notre Dame has ever had in any sport.

"One of the arguments we continued to hear was that we would certainly have entertained interviewing someone if we had known about them," says Floyd Keith, executive director of the Indianapolis-- based BCA. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Blackout: African American Coaches Remain on the Sidelines
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.