Proverbs 1-9: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary

By Bricker, Daniel P. | Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, March 2002 | Go to article overview

Proverbs 1-9: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary


Bricker, Daniel P., Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society


Proverbs 1-9: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary. By Michael V. Fox. AB 18A, New York: Doubleday, 2000, xix + 474 pp., $42.50.

Michael V. Fox has added another volume to the Anchor Bible. This publication is part of an update of R. B. Y. Scott's contribution to the Anchor Bible, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, which appeared in 1965. Scott's work was one of the earliest offerings in the Anchor Bible and fit closely with the original intention of the series (as I understand it), which was to provide basic introductory material, emphasize a new translation, and offer textual notes, along with a comparatively minimal amount of commentary. Subsequent authors added more weight to the commentary; thus Scott's work was much thinner than other volumes that followed in the series. As evidence of the larger space given in the more recent books in this series, Fox will cover the book of Proverbs in two volumes. The first volume covers chaps. 1-9 of Proverbs, while volume two will cover chaps. 10-31. Ecclesiastes will be treated in a separate volume. Thus what Scott did in one volume (257 pp.) in 1965 will be covered in three volumes in the updates.

The book consists of four main components: (1) commentary, which requires no knowledge of Hebrew; (2) excursuses on topics that arise from the exegesis; (3) philological and technical notes, which appear in small type; and (4) textual notes, which are found at the end of the book. There is also an extensive discussion of introductory matters and, as is true of all offerings in the Anchor Bible, the author provides an original translation of the text.

Fox divides Proverbs 1-9 into a prologue, ten lectures, and five interludes. The ten lectures are father-to-son discourses, each consisting of an exordium, a lesson, and a conclusion. The five interludes, regarded as later additions, are for the most part reflections on wisdom. There are also minor insertions, which are regarded as secondary.

One of Fox's most noticeable traits is that he is not hesitant to disagree with previous scholarship. The reader will soon discover that the claims of C. H. Toy (ICC), W. L. McKane (OTL), and others come under frequent and pointed criticism. However, Fox shows why he differs with these scholars and provides convincing arguments to support his beliefs. For example, there are detailed discussions regarding the identities of Lady Wisdom and the Strange Woman, in which Fox adequately cites the existing views, critiques them, and offers his own views, with reasonable arguments to back them up. It is disappointing that Richard J. Clifford's contribution to the Old Testament Library came out too late for Fox to interact with it in detail. The same can be said of the recent commentaries by Roland Murphy (WBC) and Raymond Van Leeuwen (NIB). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Proverbs 1-9: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.