Don't Deny Opioids to Patients with Pain, Plead Experts

By Boughton, Barbara | Drug Topics, April 15, 2002 | Go to article overview

Don't Deny Opioids to Patients with Pain, Plead Experts


Boughton, Barbara, Drug Topics


Though pain in America still remains undertreated, new medications and changing attitudes are improving patient access to reliable care, according to speakers at the American Association of Pain Medicine (AAPM) annual meeting, held in San Francisco recently. The meeting, cosponsored by AAPM and the National Pain Foundation, coincided with National Pain Awareness Week, from Feb. 28 to March 3.

In the past, healthcare professionals have sometimes been reluctant to prescribe opioids-considered by researchers to be excellent remedies for pain-due to fear of addiction. However, physician organizations have recently begun advocating use of opioids when truly necessary to ease debilitating pain. A recent joint statement from the American Pain Society and the American Academy of Pain Medicine noted that while abuse of controlled substances should be stopped, patients with serious pain disorders also have the right to be adequately treated with opioids.

"We are thinking about pain in a different way than we used to," said Peter S. Staats, M.D., chief of the division of pain medicine at the department of anesthesiology and critical care medicine at Johns Hopkins University. "Although not everyone should get opioids, we cannot take away this important tool from physicians."

Obstetricians and pediatricians specializing in high-risk pregnancies actually deem opioids to be among the safest drugs for the fetus, despite the unwarranted fear that they are the most dangerous, according to Rollin M. Gallagher, M.D., MPH, professor of psychiatry, anesthesiology, and public health at MCP Hahnemann University. "We must stop stigmatizing people with pain conditions and refrain from 'opiophobia,"' said Gallagher, who is co-chair of the National Pain Foundation.

Physicians are now hoping to combine opioids with other modalities and medications to increase their ability to heal pain. In an abstract presented at this year's AAPM meeting, 25 patients with neuropathic pain were treated with intrathecal ziconotide (Prialt, Elan Corp.). Ziconotide is a non-opioid, nonlocal anesthetic, developed for the treatment of severe chronic pain. The still investigational agent is the synthetic form of the cone snail peptide w-cenotoxin M-VII-A, a neurone-specific N-type calcium channel blocker. Eighteen out of the 25 patients felt significant relief on ziconotide but were unable to titrate up because of toxicity. Of the 25 patients, 21 wanted to try a combination of opioids and ziconotide to experience greater relief, Staats said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Don't Deny Opioids to Patients with Pain, Plead Experts
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.