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The American Library Association (ALA) has recorded hundreds of attempts by individuals and groups to ban books from classrooms and to remove them from library shelves. ALAsponsored Banned Books Week: Celebrating the Freedom to Read (from Sept. 23 to 30) as it has since 1982 to remind Americans not to take this precious democratic freedom for granted. In fact, at least 42 of the banned books are among the Radcliffe Publishing Course's 100 Novels of the 20th Century. Just check out the first five on the banned list: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger, The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, and The Color Purple by Alice Walker. For a complete list, visit http://www.ala.org/bbooks.

Retirement Plans Ahead

Judy Russell, who has been with the U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO) for nearly a decade, announced plans to retire early next year. As superintendent of documents, Russell has been key in designing the Federal Depository Library Program of the future, creating GPO Access, and assisting the publications sales program. She has also been an integral figure in the library community, as she worked to create an authentic digital collection of published government information.

And the Winners Are ...

On Sept. 14, the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers (ALPSP) announced the winners of the international ALPSP and the ALPSP/ Charlesworth Awards in London. The awards recognize the special achievements in the world of learned and professional publishing. Here are some of the winners:

* The ALPSP/Charlesworth Award for Learned Journals 2006 winner was the British Journal of Surgery, published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. …

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