Using Reciprocal Teaching to Develop Students' Language and Understanding: A Franchising Case Study

By Davies, Peter; Bentham, Jo et al. | Teaching Business & Economics, Spring 2002 | Go to article overview

Using Reciprocal Teaching to Develop Students' Language and Understanding: A Franchising Case Study


Davies, Peter, Bentham, Jo, Cartwright, Sarah, Wilson, Jo, Teaching Business & Economics


INTRODUCTION

This article presents an approach to using case studies that aims to exploit their potential for developing students' language skills.

This approach is guided by three main ideas. Firstly, we have aimed to deal with the problem of students being put off by excessive amounts of information when confronted with a complete case study. To overcome this obstacle, we have made the information available in small units which students have to put together.

Secondly, we have aimed to structure the tasks so that students themselves take the prime responsibility for working out how the elements of the case study should be put together. In doing so we draw upon the idea of `reciprocal teaching', a concept which we explain later in the article.

Thirdly, we have aimed to develop students' narrative skills as a contribution to improving their literacy. We explain how the quality of students' narratives - or stories - has been analysed and how this relates to the way we have organised our tasks. In developing this approach we have aimed to provide a way in which the use of case studies in business studies can be more strongly geared to the aim of developing literacy, which currently has such a high profile through the Key Stage 3 Literacy Strategy.

We describe how we implemented the approach through a case study on franchising, we give an account of how this approach worked in three different schools, and we explain how we would amend it in the light of our experience.

DEVELOPING LITERACY THROUGH BUSINESS STUDIES

The Key Stage 3 Literacy Strategy (DFES, 2001) stresses the importance of the development of students' language skills for their achievement in secondary school. We might, therefore, hope that the Literacy Strategy will lead to improvements in students' writing in business studies. However, given the focus of most departments in our subject area on teaching at Key Stage 4 and above, there is a risk that the Literacy Strategy will have only marginal influence on our thinking and practice.

This would be unfortunate for two reasons. Firstly, subjects that wish to retain the image of being 'up with the pace' in school need to participate in and be influenced by developments that are affecting core subjects. Isolation from mainstream developments in the curriculum leads to the development of an image of being out-of-touch, old-- fashioned and irrelevant.

Secondly, teaching in business studies has much to gain from careful attention to the relationship between language and learning. Teachers of business studies have long relied on case studies, and these are really no more than specific types of story. Different types of fictional and non-fictional story share a `story grammar' although the form of the plot will vary according to the story type. The ability of students to understand, analyse and create stories is, therefore, highly relevant to achievement in business studies.

As might be expected, improving these abilities has been the attention of a great deal of research within the field of language in education, and one strategy is known as `reciprocal teaching' (Palincsar and Brown, 1984). We are all familiar with the impact that teaching a subject has on our own understanding. Reciprocal teaching takes this idea and applies it to students' learning. That is, if teaching has such an impact on our own learning, why not try to incorporate the essential elements of this process into what we require of students?

Palincsar and Brown claim to identify those elements, and their reciprocal teaching strategy provides a framework that can be used in planning teaching so that the activities required of students make demands on their thinking that are similar in type to those that teachers experience in delivering lessons.

In this article we briefly summarise some principles of story grammar and reciprocal teaching and explain how we used these as a basis for devising a lesson on franchising. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Using Reciprocal Teaching to Develop Students' Language and Understanding: A Franchising Case Study
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.