The Expense of Spirit

By Fox, Josh | TheatreForum, Summer/Fall 2005 | Go to article overview

The Expense of Spirit


Fox, Josh, TheatreForum


Th' expense of spirit in a waste of shame Is lust in action; and till action, lust Is perjured, murderous, bloody, full of blame, Savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust; Enjoy'd no sooner but despised straight; Past reason hunted; and no sooner had, Past reason hated, as a swallowed bait, On purpose laid to make the taker mad: Mad in pursuit and in possession so; Had, having, and in quest to have, extreme; A bliss in proof, and proved, a very woe Before, a joy proposed; behind, a dream.

All this the world well knows; yet none knows well To shun the heaven that leads men to this hell.

William Shakespeare: Sonnet 129

The Expense of Spirit

Written and directed by Josh Fox

Produced by International WOW Company

Dedication: For Mom, Kathy, and Vinnie

Lighting Design: Charles Foster

Set Design: David Esler

Sound Design: Josh Fox

Dramaturg: Anne Erbe

Producing Management: Jill Beckman

Stage Management: Lyndsey Goode

CAST:

Marty: Deborah Wallace

Bernie: Robert Saietta

Alicia: Ikuko Ikari

Jo: Alanna Medlock

Fred: Jy Murphy

Mitch: Will O'Hare

Sgt.Smith: Nick Jaeger

Cadet Johnson: Thomas Westphal

Sally: Jessica Weinstein

Also Featuring (Ohio): Sauda Jackson, Julian Rad, Jessica Hedrick, Zina Anaplioti, Patrick McCaffrey, Lily Feinn, Pedro Rafael Rodriguez, Sarah Nedwek, Peter Letrre, Jonathon Greene.

(Workshop): Ivan Goris, Lee Gundersheimer, Erin Alexis Randolph, Nicolas Rincon, Vlamyr Viscaya. The role of Fred was initially played by Peter Lettre.

Opened 1-24 December, 2004 at The Ohio Theater, New York City.

Workshop productions at The Ohio Theaters Ice Factory Festival July 7-10, 2004 and New York Stage and Film Festival, Powerhouse Theater, Vassar College, July 31, 2004.

International WOW Company's production of The Expense of Spirit will re-open in New York in November 2005. For further info go to www.internationalwow.org.

The following text was written in a workshop with members of the International WOW Company. Actors included: Deborah Wallace, Robert Saietta, Ikuko Ikari, Alanna Medlock, Peter Lettre, Jy Murphy, Thomas Westphal, Will O'Hare, Patrick McCaffrey, Peter Rodriguez, Nick Jaeger, Jessica Weinstein, Lee Gundersheimer, Jessica Hedrick, Lily Feinn, Julian Rad, Sauda Jackson, Zina Anaplioti, Ivan Goris, Sarah Nedwek, Vlamyr Vizcaya, Nicolas Rincon, Paul Garcia, and Erin Randolph. The cast is acknowledged here because of their continuing contributions to the life of the text.

International WOW Company's production of The Expense of Spirit worked with music in two ways. There was an orchestral score that created expressionistic shifts in the emotion of the scenes, scoring the play as if it were a film. The orchestral score served to elevate certain moments from the private to the epic, bringing the audience closer to the inner emotional states of the characters. You may find it necessary to find a musical score for the expressionistic parts of the play that is continuous or repeats the same themes, to build a consciousness of the changes in the audience through repetition. During the prologue and during the slow-motion and fast motion sequences of the party, the score helps also to separate Marly and Jo from the rest of the party. The second kind of music was Christmas music. Christmas music has this incredibly strange dual effect. It can make you really happy. Or it can make you want to throw up. So of course, I used Christmas Music during the more "realistic" parts of the party, where the party goers are acting in real time. In contrast to the orchestral score which brings the audience in, the Christmas music in the party scenes provided distance, making the ordinary seem disconnected, and disconcerting.

Note about the B'K'LYN song:

To find out how to sing the "Brooklyn" song, rent the directors cut of Husbands by John Cassavetes. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Expense of Spirit
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.