Practical Approaches to Using Insulin Analogs and Premixed Insulin Analogs in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

By Anonymous | Drug Topics, December 11, 2006 | Go to article overview

Practical Approaches to Using Insulin Analogs and Premixed Insulin Analogs in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes


Anonymous, Drug Topics


An educational activity certified for physicians, pharmacists, nurses, and dietitians.

Program Goal

The goal of this program is to provide theoretical and practical knowledge to Healthcare providers regarding the use of insulin analogs and premixed insulin analogs in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Target Audience

This activity is intended for physicians, pharmacists, nurses, and dietitians who care for patients with type 2 diabetes.

Educational Objectives

* Review the prevalence and progressive nature of diabetes and the associated economic implications.

* Discuss the importance of glycemic control in type 2 diabetes and current strategies for achieving it.

* Explain how and when to initiate insulin for type 2 diabetes, including advantages and potential barriers.

* Compare different insulin formulations and regimens for type 2 diabetes, and discuss their appropriateness for different patient types.

* Review recent advances in insulin technology and the use of diabetes-care teams.

Editorial Review Board

John B. Buse, MD, PhD, FACE

Chief, Division of General Internal Medicine

Director, Diabetes Care Center

University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Barbara Kocurek, PharmD, BCPS, CDE

Diabetes Education Coordinator

Baylor Health Care System

Irving, Texas

Carolyn Robertson, APRN, MSN, BC-ADM, CDE

Associate Director

New York Diabetes Program

New York, New York

Gretchen A. Youssef, MS, RD, CDE

Program Manager

MedStar Diabetes Institute

Washington, DC

Accreditation

In order to receive your CME Certificate or Statement of Credit, you must read the monograph and complete and return the post test and evaluation. Your statement will be mailed within 6 to 8 weeks upon receipt of your materials. There is no cost to participate.

Release date: October 16, 2006

Expiration date: October 16, 2008

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and Policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint sponsorship of the American Academy of CME, Inc. and Scherer Clinical Communications. The American Academy of CME, Inc. is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education (CME) for physicians.

Physician Credit

The American Academy of CME, Inc. designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1.50 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)(TM). Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Pharmacists

The American Academy of CME, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. This program provides 1.50 contact hours (0.150 CEUs) of continuing education credit.

ACPE Universal Program Number 297-999-06-015-H01.

Registered Nurses

The American Academy of CME, Inc. (Academy) is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.

The Academy designates this educational activity for 1.50 contact hours.

ANCC Accredited Providers have been approved by The National Certification Board for Diabetes Educators (NCBDE) as providers of continuing education. Individuals seeking recertification from the NCBDE can use continuing education contact hours received through participation in this activity.

Dietitians

The American Academy of CME, Inc. is a Continuing Professional Education (CPE) Accredited Provider with the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR) from June 1, 2006 to May 31, 2009. Registered dietitians (RD) and dietetic technicians, registered (DTR) will receive 1.50 Continuing Professional Education Units (CPEUs) for completion of this program. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Practical Approaches to Using Insulin Analogs and Premixed Insulin Analogs in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.