Doha, What Next?

By Francis, Patricia | International Trade Forum, July 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

Doha, What Next?


Francis, Patricia, International Trade Forum


The business community needs to show the power of partnership in making the Doha promise a reality. Businesses of developing countries have an interest in staying engaged and making their views known to government negotiators - and to the public at large.

People have varied reactions to the suspension of trade talks on the Doha Development Agenda. That is because the stalemate in the Doha Development Agenda reflects both the promise and the perils of globalization.

Businesses in developing countries are the prime audience concerned by the outcome of the talks. But the voice of business needs to be stronger. Without their input, trade negotiators cannot be effective.

Two sides to a coin

Globalization has made its mark, with trade between countries skyrocketing. According to the World Trade Organization (WTO), trade has risen from $2.3 trillion in 1980 to $12.6 trillion in 2005.

WTO has been an important driver in this process. More open trade rules have allowed firms to take advantage of markets and technology advances, and discover new business opportunities. These firms trade across borders as they never have before, with developing countries getting an increasing share of the benefits.

Indeed, a recent report on the world economy in The Economist magazine notes that the emerging world now produces 43% of world exports, and buys half of the exports of America, Japan and the Euro area combined. What's more, last year it accounted for over half of global economic output (measured in purchasing power parity) and over half the growth in global output. It also holds 70% of the world's foreign exchange reserves.

Yet there is lingering discomfort among those who are left out; the world's 50 poorest countries have not had a share in the growth of global trade. Globalization has had a social cost. Despite its success, the challenge of globalization remains the growing gap between rich and poor, as demonstrated by the confrontations and political stalemate attached to the Doha Development Agenda.

The vision behind the Doha Development Agenda was to contribute to the efforts of governments to alleviate poverty in their countries while creating real and sustainable opportunities for wealth creation. Poor countries have real concerns about preference erosion and declining terms of trade for commodities in general, as well as market access for specific commodities, such as cotton. They express concerns about the food and livelihood security of their people, as well as their positions on services and trade facilitation. These concerns reflect their perceived inability to implement commitments arising out of these agreements.

Where is the voice of business?

In part, this situation has arisen because governments have a lack of trust and confidence in the process to address the real problems of transforming business sectors without major social dislocation. Regardless of the state of play, countries must prepare their economies and governments should be armed with the information they need to negotiate terms that will allow their businesses to compete internationally.

To be effective, government trade negotiators need to listen to business. Without the input of business, trade negotiators cannot be effective. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Doha, What Next?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.