Are Autonomous Naval Vessels the Next Big Wave?

By Jean, Grace | National Defense, January 2007 | Go to article overview

Are Autonomous Naval Vessels the Next Big Wave?


Jean, Grace, National Defense


JUST AS DRONES have proliferated in the skies, Navy and industry officials say unmanned systems also will take to the world's waterways in greater numbers.

"I think there's a lot of growth potential," Capt. Paul Ims, program manager of unmanned maritime systems, tells National Defense.

With a variety of unmanned platforms set to play a large role in the littoral combat ship fleet in the next several years, the sea service is working on a roadmap for unmanned surface vehicles. "The roadmap is really a vision document. It lays out the missions that the Navy intends to pursue in unmanned surface vehicles, and what are the capabilities, what are the technologies that we need to develop," Ims says. "We're looking at where we want to be in 2015, 2020 with this capability."

As the Navy is reducing the size of ship crews, it is using new technologies to enable an individual sailor to do more, says Ims. "That's one of the real promises of unmanned surface vehicles."

An example is mine warfare, which is one of the missions planned for the new littoral combat ship.

General Dynamics Robotic Systems in October was awarded a $12.7 million contract to build four unmanned surface vehicles for the LCS anti-submarine warfare mission module. The 11-meter vehicles will carry payloads of towed arrays, dipping sonar sensors and acoustic sources.

"We're on track to put unmanned vehicles on LCS," says Ims.

The Navy declined to elaborate on the specifics of the unmanned surface vehicle roadmap, but at a technology demonstration of an unmanned maritime vessel at the Washington Navy Yard, service representatives expressed interest in systems that would fit on the LCS, have robust non-lineof-sight communications and have advanced artificial intelligence capabilities.

Unmanned maritime vessels reguire a high level of artificial intelligence to conduct missions, says Ims.

"The awareness of where it is, and the ability to utilize sensors and either make the decision on board or go back to the manned platform and get a decision, that artificial intelligence, that autonomy - that's one of the challenges," says Ims. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Are Autonomous Naval Vessels the Next Big Wave?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.