5 QUESTIONS for George Miller

By Schoeff, Mark, Jr. | Workforce Management, January 15, 2007 | Go to article overview

5 QUESTIONS for George Miller


Schoeff, Mark, Jr., Workforce Management


George Miller

Chairman, House Education and Labor Committee

Rep. George Miller, D-California, became chairman of the just renamed House Education and Labor Committee when Democrats took control of Congress this month. Representing the East Bay of San Francisco since 1975, Miller recently played a prominent role in making a minimum wage increase a congressional priority. He also has helped shape the Democrats' Innovation Agenda, which calls for graduating 100,000 new scientists, mathematicians and engineers during the next four years. Miller recently spoke to Workforce Management staff writer Mark Schoeff Jr.

Workforce Management: You have emphasized that Education and Labor is the "people's committee." What did you mean?

George Miller: We think the core mission of this committee is to strengthen the middle class. This is where most Americans live. Its jurisdiction really speaks to the issues that were raised in the election. They all are in this committee, in one form or another: minimum wage, college costs, globalization, workforce skills and innovation. This committee has substantial jurisdiction that impacts people's lives.

WM: What differences will employers see in the committee under your leadership compared to the last 12 years under Republicans?

Miller: I have the strong sense that the corporate body includes employees. Often, you'll have corporate spokesmen talking as if their only obligation is to shareholders. The employees built up the company. There are three legs to the stoolthe shareholders, the management and the employees. …

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5 QUESTIONS for George Miller
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