Hats off to Friends!

By Churchill, Janis | Technology and Children, September 2006 | Go to article overview

Hats off to Friends!


Churchill, Janis, Technology and Children


hats off to friends! Book Lobel, A. (1979). Days with frog and toad. New York: HarperCollins Publishers. [64 pages].

summary of book

This book contains five stories (chapters) erf Frog and load and their fun adventures together. In one story, Frog gives Toad a hat that is too big for him on his birthday. Frog had to work on the hat to make sure it would fit Toad correcdy. This fun and easy-to-read chapter book is always a treat for young children-and they will learn much about great friendship as well.

student introduction

Frog and Toad are great friends! They have fun together no matter what they are doing, whether playing with kites or telling scary stories. You will be making many new friends this year in school. Your job will be to design a hat for another student in our classroom. By interviewing your partner, you will be able to find out some of his or her likes-and dislikes, too.

design brief

Suggested Grade Level 1-3

Design and create a hat that will fit your partner, and also tell others about your partner's interests. Be sure to measure the circumference of your partner's head for a proper fit. You should include four items on the hat that represent things that your partner thinks are fun!

teacher hints

1. This activity is perfect for a beginning of the year "getting to know you" lesson.

2. To incorporate writing skills into the lesson, students should come up with at least five questions for their partners and show them to you before starting the interview process. They should also write a paragraph using the answers. They can use this paragraph to read from when they are sharing the hats at the end of the activity. …

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