OBITUARIES: T. Mark Hodges, AHIP, FMLA, 1933-2006

By Helguera, Byrd S. | Journal of the Medical Library Association, October 2006 | Go to article overview

OBITUARIES: T. Mark Hodges, AHIP, FMLA, 1933-2006


Helguera, Byrd S., Journal of the Medical Library Association


A native of Sheffield, England, T. Mark Hodges, AHIP, FMLA, was born on June 18, 1933, and began his career as a librarian in his native country, starting with a stint with the British Army in Egypt. He emigrated to the United States in 1953 and served in the libraries of Hamilton College and Swarthmore College and in the Brooklyn Public Library before entering the field of medical librarianship. His first appointment in this specialty was to the Harvard Medical Library (later the Countway Library of Medicine), and he went on to direct Regional Medical Library programs in New England and the Southeast. In 1972, he became director of the Medical Center Library at Vanderbilt University, and, there, he lived out his professional life.

For many, this was the passing of Mr. MLA. Mark Hodges was wholeheartedly dedicated to the organization, even up to the time of his death on April 1, 2006. He had emerged into prominence first as parliamentarian, giving to the sessions of annual meetings the tone of a gathering of the House of Commons, albeit a much better disciplined gathering. In subsequent years, he passed through many other roles, revising bylaws, chairing committee meetings, instructing continuing education courses, and speaking out on issues both weighty and controversial. Members came to expect the presence of the whole Hodges family on early morning runs and after-meeting tours. He won the respect and admiration of his colleagues everywhere, was honored with the Marcia C. Noyes Award, and honored us all in his Janet Doe Lecture.

He was also heavily involved in a number of other professional organizations, including the Association of Academic Health Science Librarians and the Mid-Tennessee Health Science Librarians Association. A charter member of the Consortium of Southern Biomedical Libraries, he served as its president from 1987 to 1989.

The strengthening of ties between medical librarians in his native country and his adopted one was a cause dear to his heart, and he never ceased in his efforts to keep alive the personal and professional contacts, exchange of information, and encouragement of formal occasions he felt were necessary. To that end, he was a regular reporter of news from the United States to British medical librarians. It was a proud moment for him when he was elected a Fellow of the (British) Library Association in 1980. The publication of his oral history interview with noted British medical bibliographer and historian Leslie Morton was a highlight of his retirement years.

Mark's last MLA responsibility was as obituaries editor of the Journal of the Medical Library Association (JMLA), and now the sad time has come for the composition of his own obituary. …

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OBITUARIES: T. Mark Hodges, AHIP, FMLA, 1933-2006
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