Rhythm and Noise: An Aesthetics of Rock

By Cooper, B. Lee | Journal of American & Comparative Cultures, Winter 2000 | Go to article overview

Rhythm and Noise: An Aesthetics of Rock


Cooper, B. Lee, Journal of American & Comparative Cultures


Rhythm and Noise: An Aesthetics of Rock. Theodore Gracyk. Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press, 1996.

Moorhead State University philosophy professor Theodore Gracyk tackles a remarkable number of music-related issues, ideas, and personalities in this brief, well-documented study. He unapologetically justifies rock music as a cultural phenomenon unique to the 20th century. "Existing primarily as a social category," writes Gracyk, "rock eludes or supersedes aesthetics" (207). This conclusion is reached after the author has determined that rock recording is a cooperative artistic venture that is distinctively dependent upon technology. It is also an activity that is timebound, capsuled in a mediated format, both creative and commercial in nature, and fraught with potential misinterpretation. Gracyk manages to dispatch a variety of critics-including Theodore Adorno, Allan Bloom, and Camille Paglia-and to explode numerous production, performing, and lifestyle myths that haunt the rock idiom.

The author asserts, "The genius of rock music has been its ability to maintain musical creativity within a commercial framework" (193). This statement not only disarms critics, but also undermines several silly mythologies about artistic purity promulgated among popular music performers. Gracyk's ability to explore and expose stereotypes, distortions, and half-truths in respect to music, management, and marketing, places his sociological perceptions among the ranks of Charlie Gillett, Nick Tosches, Peter Guralnick, Simon Frith, and Phillip Ennis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rhythm and Noise: An Aesthetics of Rock
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.