Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: A Biography

By Fiore, Eliana | Strings, April 2007 | Go to article overview

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: A Biography


Fiore, Eliana, Strings


Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: A Biography by Piero Melograni. Translation by Lydia G. Cochrane. University of Chicago Press, www.press.juchicago.edu, $30.

The story of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, one of the most prolific and popular composers the Western world has ever seen, is widely known. The virtuoso's short life is never overlooked in any classical music history book, and several mainstream movies have been produced in his honor (most notably the award-winning 1984 film Amadeus). The main question that I sought to answer when reading this new book was, "Is there a need for another biography on Mozart?"

Hasn't everything already been said?

In Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: A Biography, Italian biographer Piero Melograni proves that when dealing with a character as tunelessly fascinating, prolific, and complex as the 18th-century composer, there is always more to be said and analyzed. The author relies on personal letters written by Mozart, his devoted father Leopold, and other associates to bring a freshly human touch to the dense historical information. While other biographers may emphasize painstakingly detailed events throughout the master's 35-year life, leaving their works dry and without literary ease, Melogranl takes care to keep his work entertaining as well as informative. His literary style allows for interesting tangents on even the smallest subjects, from the state of Mozart's beard at age 17 (01 rather, lack thereof) to the severe consequences of bad drinking water in 18th-century Salzburg.

Melograni takes us from Wolfgang's earliest days as a child prodigy-detailing the Mozart family's extensive and sometimes dangerous tours around Europe and his Introduction to royalty and noblemen-through his musically seminal years in Vienna, to his untimely death in 1791. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: A Biography
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.