Letters


Not Intended For Torture

I enjoyed your February issue and Mischa Gaus' "Interrogations Behind Barbed Wire." I especially appreciated the perspective that the military did not, over time, support these practices as they occur at places like Guantánamo.

Over the past several years, I have been responsible for the development of SERE 222, the course used to train and certify SERE psychologists. During that time I met and worked with many of the psychologists and administrators of that program. I rarely found that they had any particular interest in using these techniques for the interrogation of enemy combatants.

Instead, they focused on working with victims of the practice and preparing Americans who might become the victims of these practices. SERE 222 is a non-classified course and only provides information regarding the practice of psychologists in this area.

Terry Thompson

via e-mail

Shame of the Nation

I felt I had to write to you in the middle of reading your three recent articles on Guantánamo. I am totally opposed to closing Guantánamo unless every one of its inmates is freed. Because I am sure that, if the camp were closed without this condition, those detainees would just disappear into other black holes, suffering the same, or even worse, tortures.

Yes, Gitmo is the shame of the United States, and the world is helpless to do anything about it because the United States is the bestarmed bully on earth. At least the rest of us see it... let it be a warning to us.

Evemarie Moore

Chicago

Us vs. Hem?

I thank Joel Bliefuss for giving us "ze" and "hir" in "A Politically Correct Lexicon" (February). That takes care of the nominative and possessive cases, but what about the objective and accusative?

I seem to remember that some pacifists floated "hem" a while back for a non-sexist pronoun to use as the object of verbs and prepositions. I remain in grammatical solidarity,

Sam Abrams

via e-mail

THANK YOU

We would like to honor the following people for supporting In These Times, and add their names to those recognized in our February anniversary issue.

Peter Abbott

Mary Abbracci

Jeffrey and Diane Alson

David Amor

Dana Andrewson

Susan and Eric Aubery

Paul Ayers

John Baker

Nancy Becker

Bernice Bild

Susan Blumenthal

Gary Briggs

Hank Bromley Robert M. Brown Clellen Bryant

Steve Buchtel

R. Burns

Brian Campbell

L.R. Caporael

Linnea Capps

Carol Childs

Eve Cholmar

Aimee and Doug Christensen

Jean Christie

Lisa Christopherson

Wayne Clark-Elliott

Madeleine Clyde

Daniel Cook

Nancy Cook

Darrel Crain and Nancy Teas-Crain

Kevin Czmowski

David Dawdy

Eric Decker and Susan Stone

Robert Deneen

Loraine Dimock

Henry D'Souza

Leonard Duroche

Mike Farin

Audrey Faulkner

Keith Finlayson

Todd Freeberg

Mike Friedrich

Ken Frisof

David Gassman

Beverley Geer

John Georgian

Norbert Goldfield

Nicky Gonzalez Yuen and Jude Yuen

Frances Goodman

Neal Gosman

C. …

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