No Waiting Place

By Berkmann, Marcus | The Spectator, June 7, 1997 | Go to article overview

No Waiting Place


Berkmann, Marcus, The Spectator


New albums come and new albums go, often with bewildering speed. Say what you like about the pop industry, but it doesn't hang around. There's always a new act to talk up, another album to promote. This suits both pop's core audience, who, being teenage, tend to have teenage attention spans, and most journalists, who proudly retain their teenage attention spans until death. When you are so busy looking forward to what's next, you quickly forget what was supposed to be next only a short time ago. As a result, when an act fails it tends to do so in private. No one is paying attention; they have all moved on to something else.

This does not just apply to the unknowns or the barely knowns. It frequently applies to the very well knowns indeed. Just this year, some very well knowns indeed have experienced quite striking commercial failures with new albums, despite the usual tons of publicity from our distinctively pliant press. David Bowie's Earthling, for example, was greeted world-wide as a triumphant return to form. The few people who bought it, however, were much less impressed. In this country die-hard Bowie fans propelled the album directly to number 1, but within a fortnight it was in freefall, leaving the chart as precipitously as it had entered it. Three months later, the parachute still hasn't opened.

Glorious, too, was the hype surrounding the Bee Gees' latest comeback: interviews everywhere, a South Bank Show dedicated to their tight-trousered muse, even a hit single to show they still had it in them. But the album hasn't sold. Still Waters jogs along in the lower reaches of the chart, several places below yet another new compilation of the trio's old hits. You can only come back so many times before they ask you to go away again.

Are any reputations sacred? It seems not. Whitney Houston's last film soundtrack, The Bodyguard, was the second largest selling soundtrack of all time, after Saturday Night Fever. She tried it again with The Preacher's Wife: it stiffed magnificently. The great INXS comeback, fuelled by singer Michael Hutchence's tabloid-friendly relationship with Paula Yates, generated many column inches but not many sales. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

No Waiting Place
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.