The Los Angeles County Response to Child Abuse and Deafness: A Social Movement Theory Analysis

By Embry, Richard A.; Grossman, Frank D. | American Annals of the Deaf, Winter 2006 | Go to article overview

The Los Angeles County Response to Child Abuse and Deafness: A Social Movement Theory Analysis


Embry, Richard A., Grossman, Frank D., American Annals of the Deaf


THERE IS INCREASINGLY STRONG evidence that children with disabilities are at higher risk for maltreatment when compared to children without disabilities. There is also concern about the adequacy of child welfare services for children and parents with disabilities, particularly those disabilities that result in a communication impairment. This article describes a successful community practice effort in Los Angeles County that resulted in the establishment of a comprehensive array of linguistically and culturally competent child abuse prevention and treatment services for the maltreated deaf child and for the deaf parent at risk for child abuse perpetration. Social movement theory is used to analyze a change effort that was developed and implemented by a broad coalition of members of the Deaf and hearing communities. Elements of the problem, social movement theory, the coalition, the change strategy, and the results are described.

For several years, advocates for the Deaf community, researchers, and service providers have attempted to bring attention to the problem of maltreatment and the deaf child (Sullivan, Vernon, & Scanlon, 1987). These efforts have focused on examining the prevalence of maltreatment of deaf children (Knutson & Sullivan, 1993), risk factors related to maltreatment of deaf children (Embry, 2000; Mather & Mitchell, 1993; Sullivan & Knutson, 1998), child welfare system capacity to serve the deaf child and deaf parent (Kennedy, 1992; Ulgen & Petal, 1992), and models for effective child abuse prevention and treatment services for the deaf child and support services for deaf parents at risk to perpetrate child maltreatment (Embry, 1993; Sullivan, Scanlan, Brookhouser, Schulte, & Knutson, 1992).

The present article describes efforts in Los Angeles County, CA, conducted by the Advocacy Council for Abused Deaf Children (Advocacy Council) between 1990 and 1996 that resulted in significant reform of child welfare services for the deaf child and parent.' We review current literature regarding the maltreatment of deaf children, discuss child welfare services for deaf children and deaf parents, review central elements of social movement theory, and describe the Los Angeles County effort. This reform effort demonstrates that changes in the political/institutional structures, the ability to garner resources, and the ability to make claims that resonate with diverse stakeholder groups are essential to successful reform. In addition, this analysis of the efforts of a coalition among the Deaf community, child welfare specialists, researchers, private agencies, and public agencies extends the application of social movement theory described in the social work community practice literature (H. J. Rubin & I. S. Rubin, 2001; Weil & Gamble, 1995).

Maltreatment of the Deaf Child and the Inadequacy of Current Child Welfare Services

There is strong evidence that children with disabilities, including deaf children, are at increased risk for maltreatment when compared to children without disabilities.2 One study investigating the risk for maltreatment of children with disabilities examined a nationally representative sample of substantiated child maltreatment cases and found that the incidence of maltreatment among children with disabilities was 1.7 times higher than the rate for children without disabilities (Westat, Inc., 1993). Two investigations by Sullivan and Knutson-one using a hospital-based sample (1998) and one using a population-based sample (2000)-also found evidence of increased risk for maltreatment among children with disabilities. '!Tie hospital-based study found that children with communication disordersincluding deaf and hard of hearing children-were twice as likely to be maltreated when compared to children without disabilities. The population-based study examined maltreatment reports made to both child protective services and law enforcement agencies-a strategy more likely to identify both intrafamilial and extrafamilial child maltreatment than the Westat study-and found that children with disabilities were 3. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Los Angeles County Response to Child Abuse and Deafness: A Social Movement Theory Analysis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.