Can Charter Schools Improve Financial and Economic Education? the Case of the Milwaukee Urban League Academy of Business and Economics

By Schug, Mark C.; Hagedorn, Eric A. | Journal of Private Enterprise, Fall 2004 | Go to article overview

Can Charter Schools Improve Financial and Economic Education? the Case of the Milwaukee Urban League Academy of Business and Economics


Schug, Mark C., Hagedorn, Eric A., Journal of Private Enterprise


This paper describes an inner city charter school-the Milwaukee Urban League Academy of Business and Economics-that speciales in a business and economics curriculum. We present an overview of charter schools and summarize some of the research on their effectiveness. We then describe the special curriculum in one charter school and present an evaluation of the second year of the effort to implement the curriculum.

What is a charter school?

Charter schools are a special sort of public school. Charter schools are public schools that are exempt from several of the regulations applied to other public schools. Charter schools operate on the basis of a contract approved between the school operator and the state charter authorizer. Charter schools are becoming a popular market-based educational reform. According to the Center for Education Reform, there are 2,695 charter schools nationally. Wisconsin has 128 charter schools.

Charter schools come in all shapes and sizes. Most have a special mission of some kind. Among the more prominent missions are alternative education, core knowledge, science, technology, at-risk, arts, direct instruction, leadership, and careers.

While charter schools are freed from many of the rules of regular public schools, they face many issues that could hamper their success. Charter schools are often start ups. A building may need to be renovated. Decisions have to be made regarding hiring teachers and administrators, selecting benefits packages, setting up the payroll, opening up bank accounts, recruiting students, selecting curriculum, deciding on assessments, and so forth.

Despite the challenges, the initial research on charter schools has been positive. A national study of charter schools was conducted by Greene, Forster, and Winters (2003). They compared test scores in charter schools serving regular student populations with the nearest public school also serving a regular school population. Their analysis included schools in 11 states. They used year-to-year test score changes. They found positive effects from charter schools serving general populations. For the most part, these were characterized as modest gains.

Witte (2003) is conducting an ongoing study of charter schools in Wisconsin. He notes several of the difficulties in conducting this sort of research. He points out, for example, that the types of measurements are limited to standardized tests scores and that many charter schools are designed to education at risk youth. Despite many caveats, Witte concludes that charter schools are better than traditional schools at insuring that students achieve minimal and basic levels of performance. He observes, given the fact that half of the charter schools in Wisconsin are for at-risk students, that this is a worthy accomplishment.

A final study conducted by researchers at the California State University at Los Angeles (Slovacek and others 2002) compared the academic achievement of children from low income families attending charter and non-charter schools in California. They examined average scores on the Academic Performance Index-a measure used by the Stanford Achievement Test. They found that the mean scores for students in charter schools improved more (22%) than for students in non-charter schools. The difference was even more pronounced in schools with higher levels of poverty.

We are beginning to see evidence that charter schools meet their basic academic goals better than traditional public schools. Is there any evidence that charter schools can accomplish their special missions? The following is one case to consider.

Milwaukee Urban League Academy of Business and Economics

The Milwaukee Urban League Academy of Business and Economics (MULABE) is a charter school in its third year of operation in the central city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The mission of the school is to provide a strong academic program with stress on reading, mathematics, science, and social studies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Can Charter Schools Improve Financial and Economic Education? the Case of the Milwaukee Urban League Academy of Business and Economics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.