Editor's Notes

By Howard, Beverly | The Hymn, Winter 2007 | Go to article overview

Editor's Notes


Howard, Beverly, The Hymn


Our culture takes note of anniversaries: birthdays, weddings, deaths, etc. Usually the date itself holds no special significance; it is the passage of time that merits observation. Virtually all cultures and religions commemorate important anniversaries through festivals or liturgical actions. In fact, during the medieval era, the importance of marking events of the Christian year and in daily monastic life was one force that prompted medieval scientists to develop precise measurements of time.1

When a friend, celebrating his thirtieth anniversary of ordination to Christian ministry, invited me to present an organ concert as part of the festivities, it seemed natural to develop a program including a theme of "time" by programming organ works connected with "time" such as "Carillon de Westminster" by Louis Vierne and works for mechanical clockworks by Mozart and Haydn. Of course, members of The Hymn Society tend to commemorate important hymnic anniversaries through singing at our conferences. To encourage "singing hymnic anniversaries," the Winter issue of THE HYMN contains several pieces pertinent to this endeavor.

An annual feature of the Winter issue is the Hymnic Anniversaries article, compiled this year by Paul Powell and Mary Louise VanDyke. Powell introduces the article with a discussion of the role of the Dictionary of North American Hymnology, observing its own anniversary in 2007, in establishing a working list for anniversaries.

"The Plymouth Collection Celebration-150 Years of Congregational Singing," by Jacque Browning Jones, details the exceptional work of the Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims in commemorating the 150th anniversary of the publication of Henry Ward Beecher's The Plymouth Collection. This article is a virtual "how to" in planning such an event.

This column's theme of "time" plays out with Dan Grimminger's intriguing look at nineteenth-century Lutheran chorale rhythms juxtaposed with Robin Knowles Wallace's interview of a current Lutheran hymnwriter Herman Stuempfle, FHS. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Editor's Notes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.