Multicultural Education Introduces a New Section on Higher Education

By Clark, Christine | Multicultural Education, Summer 2002 | Go to article overview

Multicultural Education Introduces a New Section on Higher Education


Clark, Christine, Multicultural Education


This new "Higher Education" section of Multicultural Education magazine will focus on the range of initiatives being undertaken on college and university campuses across the country and abroad that speak to diversity, multicultural organizational development, social justice, and multicultural educational concerns. Submissions of articles are solicited that focus on a range of student, faculty, and staff endeavors related to these concerns.

Student-directed articles might address"Hot Topics on Campus," for example, the focus on Intergroup Dialogue Programs in this section's ensuing first article. Additional areas of student focus might include Pan Hellenic/Intra Fraternity Council collaboration; Muslim, Arab, Middle Eastern stereotyping and hate incidents; date rape; racial profiling by campus police; strategies for challenging legacies of racism within Greek life (e.g., Blackface incidents); or Peer Mediation Programs.

Articles relevant to faculty undertakings might include cutting-edge research such as that addressing the struggle to preserve race-based affirmative action criteria in student admissions; multicultural content and pedagogical curricular transformation across disciplines; the use of non-cognitive variables as criteria for student admission, in addition to or in lieu of standard forms of assessment like the SAT's; intersectionality, the systematic study of the intersections of race, gender, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and other dimensions of difference; or the value of diversity in higher education. …

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