A Stone in the Bridge of Peace

By Enkhchuluun, Dulmaa | International Educator, May/June 2007 | Go to article overview

A Stone in the Bridge of Peace


Enkhchuluun, Dulmaa, International Educator


MONGOLIA HAS NO MACDONALD1S fast food, Starbucks coffee, Hilton hotel, nor any other international franchise. Yet, I know those things will come as a part of globalization, and I hope to use my education in the United States to help my country enjoy the financial benefits of the global economy but to avoid some of the social problems.

Please allow me to introduce myself. I am a Mongolian of the Sartuul clan of the Altai Mountains of Mongolia, but I mostly grew up in the capital, Ulaanbaatar. My mother, Dulmaa, was named for the Sky Goddess, and she gave me the name Enkhchuluun, meaning Peace Stone. My goal in life is live up to the name that she gave me, to be a stone in the foundation of world peace and progress.

My quest began at age 16 just when Mongolia opened to the outside in 1996 and a group of Turkish teachers founded a school in Ulaanbaatar; I was fortunate to receive a scholarship for their first class of students. Then in 2000,1 went to the United States as part of the early cohort of Mongolian students to study in the West. I enrolled in English courses for six months at St. Thomas University in St. Paul, Minnesota, and then I studied international relations at Augsburg College across the river in Minneapolis. I also worked as a research assistant at Macalester College, and thus I experienced work and study in three very different institutions of higher education.

In the year that I was permitted to work after graduation in the United States, I wanted to learn about the profit sphere as well as the non-profit, and I wanted to live in Washington D.C. I was fortunate to receive an internship at NAFSA: Association of International Educators, while I worked part-time as a teller at the Bank of America.

In August 2005 I returned home to Mongolia with the intention of using my education and experience abroad to serve my country. I started working in the foreign affairs section of Parliament to reacquaint myself with my country, but at the same time I began the creation of my dream company. I wanted to make a small tourist agency that seeks to preserve our unique environment and the nomadic heritage of Mongolia while sharing it with the outside world. …

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